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AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 3D Cache Eight Core 4.5GHz (Socket AM4) Processor - Retail - Go Go Go xD

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The days of upping the voltage and nearly doubling the clock are over, chips come well tuned out the box, focus has shifted to other areas for improvement.
While this is true for the most part, we must not forget our roots.

And those days of doubling your clock are not quite over with yet! :D

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Soldato
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If this is your point of view you must find yourself in a bit of a paradox, posting this on a forum dedicated to overclocking and all.

The days of cpu overclocking having a significant impact on anything are long over ; why? because manufacturers do it them selves now. That `boost clock` is the overclocking a person would do all those years ago, and with better control.
 
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AMD could have released 6nm EUV Zen 3 desktop CPUs in 2022, which would've offered better all around performance than V-Cache.

Instead they've only offered this with the mobile 6000 series, which offers 5ghz clocks, at least up to 8 cores.

It was cheaper just to add on v-cache to an existing 7nm design like the 5800X though, so that's what we got. I think also, AMD made a judgement that it was not worth having 2 new generations in the same year on new fab. processes.

For one thing, it would make the jump from 7nm (or 6nm EUV) to 5nm EUV seem less impressive.
 
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I personally now find overclocking a chore, the 5950x in particular has scarred me for life using curve optimiser and then trying to find stability.

I tend to use a PC as a console, e.g just plug and play so I'm glad that overclocking headroom is minimal on most components.

It might make your benchmark scores higher but you'd be hard pushed to notice much difference gaming unless you've got rivatuner or something running.

I get more satisfaction out of undervolting and running cooler and quieter with similar performance to stock.
 
Caporegime
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Caporegime
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I personally now find overclocking a chore, the 5950x in particular has scarred me for life using curve optimiser and then trying to find stability.

I tend to use a PC as a console, e.g just plug and play so I'm glad that overclocking headroom is minimal on most components.

It might make your benchmark scores higher but you'd be hard pushed to notice much difference gaming unless you've got rivatuner or something running.

I get more satisfaction out of undervolting and running cooler and quieter with similar performance to stock.
5800X3D sounds like your perfect CPU then. :p
 
Soldato
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I personally now find overclocking a chore, the 5950x in particular has scarred me for life using curve optimiser and then trying to find stability.

I tend to use a PC as a console, e.g just plug and play so I'm glad that overclocking headroom is minimal on most components.

It might make your benchmark scores higher but you'd be hard pushed to notice much difference gaming unless you've got rivatuner or something running.

I get more satisfaction out of undervolting and running cooler and quieter with similar performance to stock.

It's more beneficial to those on low end hardware. I tuned up a system recently for someone with a low budget and had their 3770K and GTX 1650 running games 15-20% faster than before with no more power draw as well, so for them it made lots of games that were choppy and naff, actually playable.
 
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Yeah my plan is to buy one. I stupidly didn't buy on release and now can't seem to find one in stock at a reputable retailer. It's on pre-order at OCUK.

How have you found it compared to your 5950x?
Faster in some games. Some noticeably so, some less so. Big improvement to 1%/0.1% lows which is the main benefit for me.

Much cooler and way less than 50% of the power draw of my 5950X with PBO enabled.
 
Associate
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Faster in some games. Some noticeably so, some less so. Big improvement to 1%/0.1% lows which is the main benefit for me.

Much cooler and way less than 50% of the power draw of my 5950X with PBO enabled.

That all sounds great.

The lows is the big thing for me, far more than average framerate.

I'd be almost tempted to hold back on buying zen 4 if I had the 5800X3D while any early adopter issues are ironed out, and fast DDR5 becomes commonplace and cheaper.
 
Soldato
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Faster in some games. Some noticeably so, some less so. Big improvement to 1%/0.1% lows which is the main benefit for me.

Much cooler and way less than 50% of the power draw of my 5950X with PBO enabled.
One of the things that out me off the 5950X was the extra power draw and heat, besides it being overkill for my use. I'm happy I went with my head for a change.
 
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One of the things that out me off the 5950X was the extra power draw and heat, besides it being overkill for my use. I'm happy I went with my head for a change.
If you run it at stock, the power draw and heat is quite insignificant. But you know me, everything is tuned for optimal system performance so in Warzone I could see up to 155W with the 5950X and PBO/Curve Optimiser enabled.

That's now like 40/50W with the 5800X3D and Curve Optimiser and obviously, better performance. Quite incredible really. :p
 
Soldato
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If you run it at stock, the power draw and heat is quite insignificant. But you know me, everything is tuned for optimal system performance so in Warzone I could see up to 155W with the 5950X and PBO/Curve Optimiser enabled.

That's now like 40/50W with the 5800X3D and Curve Optimiser and obviously, better performance. Quite incredible really. :p
Impressive. I need stability first but if I can get it running with lower power for minimal loss I'll give it a go. I used to run on overclocked system with 2 x 7970Ghz cards and it would easily hit 30°C in the room, not great, like military jungle training :cry: Now I want quick but cool.
 
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Impressive. I need stability first but if I can get it running with lower power for minimal loss I'll give it a go. I used to run on overclocked system with 2 x 7970Ghz cards and it would easily hit 30°C in the room, not great, like military jungle training :cry: Now I want quick but cool.
If you can justify it, get a wall mounted air conditioner. No man cave without one is complete if you have high end components turning your gaming room into the Sahara desert. :cry:
 
Associate
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I personally now find overclocking a chore, the 5950x in particular has scarred me for life using curve optimiser and then trying to find stability.

I tend to use a PC as a console, e.g just plug and play so I'm glad that overclocking headroom is minimal on most components.

It might make your benchmark scores higher but you'd be hard pushed to notice much difference gaming unless you've got rivatuner or something running.

I get more satisfaction out of undervolting and running cooler and quieter with similar performance to stock.
I'm mostly in agreement, but to be well rounded I believe in utilizing both aspects, both overclocking / overvolting and undervolting. For example, on my dual processor Xeon Rig, which is locked with a single core turbo of 3.8GHz, where OC is not possible, I have resorted to undervolting (via throttlestop) to lower temps and improve turbo aggressiveness as well as using liquid metal for better heat transfer, since that's all I can do for better performance with locked power limit (290W), FSB and multi (cant do the all core turbo hack of 3.8GHz like you can do on X99). Also using the factory liquid cooling option which is good to 300 watts and better than the optional air cooling.

Versus the chip in my 9600KF rig is a high performance, highly binned unlocked processor designed to be overclocked. Leaving nothing to chance I accepted the challenge of trying to overclock a chip that already boosts to 4.6GHz. To find the headroom I needed required a chiller and persistence and a very good cooling system. But it did pay off. This is the fastest non LN2 9600K/9600KF overclock on HWBot.org



Cooling system:



But where you go wrong is finding overclocking to be a chore. We cannot forget! That's the passion that lit up the entire scene. If you want someone else to do the overclocking for you, you are pushing yourself further away from the golden generation of overclocking. In practice we should all hold overclocking in high esteem and embrace overclocking because it's more challenging now than ever before. In other words, I don't see state of the art chips as boosting the clock speed for us so we don't need to mess with it. I see it as a greater challenge to get more out of it.
 
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But where you go wrong is finding overclocking to be a chore. We cannot forget! That's the passion that lit up the entire scene. If you want someone else to do the overclocking for you, you are pushing yourself further away from the golden generation of overclocking. In practice we should all hold overclocking in high esteem and embrace overclocking because it's more challenging now than ever before. In other words, I don't see state of the art chips as boosting the clock speed for us so we don't need to mess with it. I see it as a greater challenge to get more out of it.

I used to love overclocking, infact I used to spend more time fiddling with my PC than I did actually using it.

I had the case open most days, lapping cpus (I miss you 8700k lol) often experimenting with different fans, push pull etc. Trying different rads etc

But as I've gotten older I just want to come home in the evening and use it. I've got a solid side panel case with a D15 cooling it, and aside from cleaning the dust filters, the case stays closed.

Don't get me wrong I have tweaked some stuff, I'm running my ram at very tight timings, and using the dynamic oc on the dark hero so I get 4.7ghz on one ccx and 4,6ghz on another and get over 5ghz on most cores on single threaded tasks (by tweaking the curve).

But the days of me spending countless hours pushing things, testing for stability etc are long gone.

The last cpu I had before the 5950x was an 8700k before I sold up and moved to console gaming, and aside from lapping the cpu it was pretty straightforward to overclock, increase the multi and vcore, once you find stability, reduce the vcore slightly and re-test until unstable.

The curve optimiser tweaking on a 16core cpu was annoying for me.
 
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Many reviewers ignore those 0.1%/1% lows which is the most important thing, and in which 5800x3d gives biggest gains, performance jump is impressive, like whole new architecture, can't wait too see that technology in future generations. Cache will be key weapon from both brand now, and because of that we can expect from game developers that they will put more and more data in cache, so 5800x3d will age much better than non 3d models.
 
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der8auer has an interesting short video of the 5800x3d here, the efficiency of this chip is certainly where AMD shines, can't wait to see what architectural improvements come next.

 
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der8auer has an interesting short video of the 5800x3d here, the efficiency of this chip is certainly where AMD shines, can't wait to see what architectural improvements come next.

Yeah, and because of additional cache it doesn't need extra high clock, 4.5 ghz with that cache is comparable to 5.2-5-5 ghz ADL, Zen 3 original version would probably need to have 6 ghz to get similar performance, so i don't see a problem with lower clocks because of 3dcache, clocks will consume much more power than additional cache.
 
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