**Baddass' 19" Panel Comparison - the 8ms vs 12ms TFT's**

Soldato
Joined
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UK
Nowadays, the TFT market has started to strongly concentrate on a select few panels. More and more manufacturers are using the same panels as competitors do in their displays, and so performance between different TFT’s becomes very similar. As such, I have always suggested that a TFT purchase is based a lot on the looks of the model, and the addition of any features like DVI, USB hubs, Pivot/ Rotate functions etc which might be handy to you. Obviously price always comes into your selection, but at least the choice of panel is not so varied as it once was.

I thought it might be handy therefore if I tried to do a summary of 2 of the most popular panels used in 19” TFT’s today. You can then compare the panels available, choose one where the performance is what you need, and then find a model which looks nice and is a good price for you. I’ve borrowed some test results taken by Tom’s Hardware Guide as they do some good panel analysis in their reviews. Hopefully the info on the panels available will help distinguish between the popular panels used and identify in which areas the panels are good and bad, compared with one another.

There is a common question popping up all the time at the moment, and that is “what is the best to go for out of the 12ms and 8ms 19 inch TFT’s?” hopefully this comparison might help people decide:
:)



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The 19” Displays Compared

The 8ms Samsung 190EX-L01 TN Panel
(Hyundai L90D+, Samsung 913N, BenQ FP937S+)

vs.

The 12ms LG Philips LM190E03 panel TN Panel
and 12ms AU Optronics M190EN04 TN panel

Note: these both offer very similar performance

Viewsonic VX912, BenQ FP937S - AUO
LG1980U, Phillips 190X5)



======================================================
Comparison 1. Pixel Response and Latency

8ms_and_12ms_latencycomparison.jpg


The first graph above shows the latency of the 8ms panel compared with that of the BenQ F71e+ (which uses the 8ms AU Optronics panel, the fastest 17” panel available at the moment). The point at the far right (code 255) is the black-white transition which should be the fastest response time of the panel (which is the value normally quoted by the manufacturer). The black-white did reach 8ms as quoted by the manufacturer but only at extreme brightness / contrast settings. In reality, at suitable usable settings, the response time black-white was more like 10ms. The slowest response time of a black-grey transitions (code 50 upwards) was 27.5ms. Black-grey changes are always slower than the black-white, don’t let this put you off in any way.

For the second graph, the 12ms LG Phillips panel was pitted against the same 8ms AU Optronics 17” panel. The black-white transtion (code 255) is at best, 16ms. This is a little slower than the manufacturers spec of 12ms, but still very good. The latency peak (code 100 – 130), i.e. slowest response time, is in the darker transition areas, and so is potentially less noticeable than if it were in the lighter transition area. The slowest response time for this panel is about 34ms, not much slower than the 8ms model.

While the 8ms panel tops the 12ms a bit, that isn’t to say the 12ms is bad. It was previously king of response time for the 19” market, before the 8ms came along. Both are very good for gaming, but for the purposes of this comparison:

---------------------------------------------
Winner: = 8ms Samsung panel
---------------------------------------------



======================================================
Comparison 2. Colour Reproduction

8ms_and_12ms_colourcomparison.jpg


To read the colour fidelity graphs you basically need to look at the lines and if they are at a value of 1 or less on the Y axis then the colour reproduction is excellent. The values on the x axis are for light level, going from black colour production on the left (0), to white colour production on the right (100). When DeltaE is nearer to 2, calibration is considered successful; a slight difference remains, but it will be almost unnoticeable to the user. If DeltaE is nearer 3, then the color you see is significantly different from the one required, meaning that the user will be able to perceive the difference.

The first graph shows the difference between the desired colour shade and the actual colour shade produced on the 8ms panel. You can see from the graph that DeltaE is <1 for nearly the whole graph, and this value shows that the color fidelity is excellent. Tom’s Hardware have even stated that the 8ms panel offers colour reproduction comparative to that of an MVA panel.

The 12ms offers some good colour reproduction too, and offers good black depth which is good for gaming, and rare for a TN panel. The only problem is that there is some sparkling is visible on some colour masses, and while 82% of the colours are perfect, 96% of the values can be calibrated anyway. The colour reproduction is very good for a TN panel, especially one aimed at gamers, but the 8ms panel beats it slightly, from the tests done:

---------------------------------------------
Winner: = 8ms Samsung panel
---------------------------------------------



======================================================
Comparison 3. Viewing Angles

The 8ms Samsung panel suffers from poor viewing angles (150 Horizontal / 135 vertical). This is the main area which has been sacrificed to achieve the latest and greatest pixel response performance. Unfortunately this means that movie playback is limited, and the panel is not ideal for multi user use.

The viewing angles on the 12ms LG Phillips panel (160 / 160) are not too bad. The image viewing angles are adequate in the horizontal plane, and the vertical angle is not too bad for a TN panel as well. Movie watching is therefore a bit better on the 12ms panel, and it makes it a bit of a more ‘all-round’ panel.

--------------------------------------------------
Winner: = 12ms LG Phillips panel
--------------------------------------------------



======================================================
Comparison 4. Panel Uniformity

8ms_and_12ms_uniformitycomparison.jpg


The first diagram shows the spatial uniformity of the 8ms panel. To measure this, they put a white image on the screen, and with contrast and brightness set at 50% each, they measure the difference in this white image across the panel. The diagram shows that the image is within 15% difference across the whole panel, a very good result, meaning a good uniformity in the panels lighting and image across the screen as a whole.

The 12ms panel is a little bit inferior, being only an average uniformity across the panel. Nearly all values are within 20% of one another, and although the bottom is slightly darker, this is hardly noticeable in proper use anyway. It isn’t quite as uniform as the 8ms panel, but to be honest, in real use, you probably won’t notice any difference. For the purpose of this comparison though:

---------------------------------------------
Winner: = 8ms Samsung panel
---------------------------------------------




======================================================
Summary

comparisontable.JPG


Well the 8ms panel overall has improved on the 12ms panel in most areas. Samsung have not sacrificed colour reproduction to achieve the faster pixel response, which is normally an area which suffers with such changes. The 8ms panel is ideal for gamers and also offers some good performance in Windows / Office use. The only problem really with the 8ms panel is the viewing angles, and subsequently, movie playback. Due to this restriction, I would say that the 12ms panel is perhaps a bit more of a versatile all-rounder, offering very good gaming performance still (bare in mind this was the previous 19” panel champion before the 8ms came along), but with better viewing angles. The panel is still excellent, and although in some areas it has been topped by the 8ms models, it really depends on what you want the TFT for.

The style of the model is also going to play an important factor in your choice, and with the looks of the Viewsonic VX912, and more so the LG1980U, being available with the 12ms panel, this is an area where the older panel wins at present. Ultimately, you need to decide what areas are more important for you and I’m sure you’ll find either panel an excellent choice. Hope this has helped to compare the 2 popular panels available in the 19” market.
 
Last edited:
Associate
Joined
13 Mar 2005
Posts
43
Thanks BadAss!!!!!

Very objective analysis :cool:

Makes our buying decision a much simpler job...

Thanks again for all your time and hard work!!!

best regards

Ikki
 
Soldato
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glad you guys have found it intersting. There was a trend in threads going on recently based on whether ppl should go with one of the 8ms or one of the 12ms models. Hopefully this will help ppl decide :)
 
Soldato
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well it's not too bad, just not as all rounded as the 12ms panel. Perhaps you need to try and see one in action, then you can judge the picture's viewing angle for yourself.
 
Associate
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St Albans, Herts
Baddass could you dig up some info, please. Would there be a lot of difference between the 8ms and 12 ms on Sony SDM-HS75P and Sony SDM-HS95P? You the man!
 
Soldato
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i suspect that they have just used the common panels around i the TFT market at the moment and added the extra features of the X Black tech (improved backlight, removal of AG coating etc)

it would seem likely that the HS75P uses the 8ms AU Optronics panel (As used in the BenQ FP17e) and the HS95P uses the 12ms LG Phillips panel (as featured above). They have probably built the displays around these panels, and added their features to them. I am checking for clarification on this, but it seems likely.
 
Associate
Joined
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Posts
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Location
St Albans, Herts
Yeah, but saying that means the Sony SDM-HS95P wouldn't be any different than LG1980U, performancewise. Which as you can see from the threads it's not really the case. And also to be honest i don't belive there is that much gap even between HS75P and HS95P. So where is the truth?
Thanks Baddass!
 
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