**Baddass' Ultimate TFT FAQ and Reviews! (20" and Above Models)**

Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Ok, here it is, hopefully THE FAQ and review thread for all the TFT’s which are available at the moment! This will also save the same old questions popping up daily……..hopefully!

I want to thank all those people on the forums who have shared their opinions over the last couple of years. Hopefully I have credited you accordingly when I’ve used any quotes :). Please email me/reply to this thread if you think anything should be added/changed.

Baddass


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For a lot of information about TFT specs, terms, technology and all these guides and more, visit my site at www.tftcentral.co.uk


AMDHAPPY has provided the link to the following First Time TFT buyer's guide. It's very useful for general FAQ, a little out of date in some parts, but good to use in conjunction with this sticky, if you're looking to buy a new panel. There is also the following Guide which might help a first time buyer. There is also another great first time buyers guide provided by WASC, which is a great guide to start with. You can get it here.


If you need help calibrating your monitor, check here and also try this test pattern tool

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TFT's Covered in This Thread:

Belinea 102035W / 102030W
Belinea 2225S1W
Dell 2007WFP
Dell 2407WFP
Dell 3007WFP
NEC LCD20WGX2
Samsung 215TW
Viewsonic VX2025WM


Previously this thread was about the 17" range as well. Other TFT's Covered on my Homepage: www.tftcentral.co.uk

BenQ FP202W
Dell 2001FP
Dell 2405FPW
Samsung 213T
Viewsonic VP201




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The Massive TFT FAQ!!!



What Should I Look For In The Quoted Specification?

The first thing to realise when buying a new screen is that you can't always rely on quoted specifications. These are often exagerated for marketing purposes, and are commonly based on different measurement techniques and varying benchmarks between each manufacturer. As a guide and general rule of thumb:

- The lower the response time the better. Be aware of ISO response time figures and grey to grey transition figures
- The higher the brightness, the better
- The higher the contrast ratio, the better. This will also help indicate the black depth of the screen
- The wider the viewing angles the better

I would really recommend reading further into the details about monitor specs before you make your purchase so you can understand what they infer about the monitors performance characteristics.


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What Is the Best Panel Technology To Get?

An important thing to consider is what panel technology the screen uses you are interested in buying. While specs may look similar on paper, performance may vary quite considerably between the models due to the panel technology used. The most common technologies used are TN Film, S-IPS, MVA and PVA. These are all produced by a range of panel manufacturers and offer a variety of strengths and weaknesses. There is a reasonable amount of talk about panel technologies with many people quick to jump on a bandwagon and claim one is superior than another. They still all have their place in the modern market, and due to their different characteristics, can play a key part in finding the right monitor for your use. For more information about panel technologies, see this article


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Q. Should I Be Worried About Ghosting?

Generally nowadays with all the 5ms, 4ms and 2ms models available, ghosting is just not an issue for the majority of users. Choosing a TFT can commonly be based on design and looks, price and any extra features you might need. The fast response times of the panels used now are perfectly adequate to cut out pretty much all obvious ghosting and blurring, even in fast paced games. There are still some users who find the move from CRT screens to TFT a difficult change, but more and more users are switching over. With improving technologies being used, motion blur is becoming less of an issue.

Some time ago it is considered that a response time of 25ms or less should be fine for gaming in most cases. Panels with 16ms, 12ms and 8ms became common place and ghosting has become even less of a problem. The advent of overdrive (RTC technologies) saw a signifcant improvement in responsiveness in practice and quoted response time specs began to fall even more. The arrival of other technologies designed to reduce perceived motion blur looks set to offer another marked improvement in the performance of LCD displays. These include Black Frame Insertion, Motion Picture Acceleration, and 100Hz / 120Hz LCD technologies.

Ghosting may also depend on how susceptible you are to things like this, as one person may see no ghosting, another may see lots on the same panel. The best bet is to try and see a TFT in action in a shop and see for yourself, if that’s not possible you will have to settle for the opinions of other users and take the plunge!

Have a read here about response times if you are unsure about what specs mean


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Q. Does DVI Make A Difference?

This can depend a lot of the monitor in question. DVI offers a pure digital end to end connection between the graphics card and the monitor. VGA on the other hand has to convert the signal to analogue. In theory, digital connections should therefore offer a superior picture quality and a sharper image. In practice, this can depend on the model in question. There are a number of sharpening algorithms utlised for modern VGA interfaces which vary in the quality of the analogue/digital conversion. Some modern screens have such good analogue connections that it is very hard, or even impossible, to tell the difference between VGA and DVI.

Typically screens which don't have DVI connections offer very good quality VGA connections. Perhaps manufacturers spent more time and effort perfecting these, knowing it was all they could offer the user. On the other hand, maybe manufacturers who offer both connections don't spend as much time or money making the VGA as good as it could be, since they assume users will always use DVI anyway. This seems logical, and i practice there is a host of screens which show this trend.

If you can use DVI, then you should, since it will offer the sharpest image available for the screen. If you are limited to VGA only, I'd suggest finding some user opinions or reviews about the PQ using this intercace.


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Q. What's The Difference Between DVI-D and DVI-I ?

DVI is the first digital standard and supports a dual link mode, which allows res up to 2048 x 1536 and beyond. The DVI specification supports hot plug and play display devices.

There are 3 main different configurations when it comes to DVI:
1. DVI-A is designed for analogue only connections
2. DVI-D is designed for digital signals only
3. DVI-I (Integrated) is a single connector which is designed for both digital and analog use, and is backward compatible with analog displays.

Most LCD monitors that support digital signal have DVD-D connectors.

The cables: DVI-I single link configuration provides bandwidth sufficient for res up to 1600 x 1200 and high speed transmission up to 4.95Gbps.
DVI-I dual link config can do 2048 x 1536 @ 9.9Gbps, this is the same for a DVI-D dual link configuration.

Cable suppliers recommend: "Most customers should use a DVI-D to DVI-D cable. We suggest that you do not order a DVI-I to DVI-I cable unless you are certain that it will work for your application."

< ]more info>


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Should I Worry About 6-bit vs 8-bit Panels?

There is a lot of talk about colour depth on TFT screens. It's important to put this into perspective though, and not jump on the bandwagon of 8-bit being much much better than 6-bit. Yes, 8-bit displays are preferable, and can offer an improved colour palette, more freedom from grading and banding, and are the choice for colour critical displays. However, modern 6-bit screens use a range of FRC technologies which can offer some impressive results. Colour range is good, screens show no obvious gradation of colours, and they show no FRC artefacts or glitches.

Manufacturers use 6-bit panels (+FRC) to help keep costs lower, and for the majority of users I would suggest it is difficult to tell the difference in practice between a 6-bit or 8-bit panel. Colour accuracy of modern 6-bit panels (mostly TN Film) is also very impressive, an area which used to be lacking, even with a decent colorimeter. If you're an average user, you shouldn't worry too much about the situation too much, most users will find a 6-bit panel perfectly adequate for their needs. If you need a display for colour critical work, then you should certainly consider the graphics range from manufacturers which all use 8-bit (or above) colour depth.


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Q. What's The Best Way To Clean a TFT Screen?

The simplest and cheapest way to clean a TFT screen is with a slightly damp cloth, wipe off the left behind water with a towel or similar then smooth/dry completely with a yellow polishing/dusting cloth. Be careful not to use products such as toilet paper and kitchen roll as they contain lint and can leave scratches on your beloved screen! Cleaning solution from opticians and lint free clothes for lens cleaning are also very good.

For the perfectionist, there is "Lindy" brand TFT cleaner. It costs about £4 for a pump-dispenser. You can pick it up at office supply stores and computer fairs.


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Q. What's The Situation With Dead Pixels?

Unfortunately dead pixels can be an issue on TFT screens as they are often developed during the manufacturing stage. For retail costs to be kept low the companies cannot afford to make all screens defect-free and check for dead pixels all the time. Pixels can described in the following ways:

- Fully dead - stuck on black of white
- Dead Sub Pixel - Stuck on Red / Green / Blue
- Lazy - stuck on a colour, but sometimes can change. If the pixels are only lazy, there may be hope of reviving them. If they are fully dead, they will stay that way.

They very rarely develop during use, unless you have a habit of poking the screen. If you are careful with the screen, hopefully you shouldn't develop any further pixel problems.

To test for dead pixels, there is "Dead Pixel Buddy" program available. You can manually cycle through 5 full screen colours (black/white/red/green/blue) to check for dead or lazy pixels (use UP key) or rapidly cycle through all of the colours automatically to try and coax lazy sub-pixels back to life. Leave it running for half an hour, if you're lucky it can work! (SPACE key). ESC key ot exit.

If you want to insure that you receive a pixel perfect screen (and who wouldn't at the kind of prices you are paying for the TFT!?!) then you can often pay for pixel checks from some online retailers. Beware though! Never buy a TFT from retailers who offer the pixel check without having the check done as you can be sure the screens they find to be non-perfect will be winging their way to the customers who don't have the check! The only other option to insure you get a pixel perfect screen is to check out the panel in a shop in person, then you can see for yourself.....

If you find you have a dead pixel there is not a lot you can do unfortunately. If you have a certain number of dead pixels (usually at least 3 or a certain number centrally on the panel) then the manufacturer will replace the TFT for you, but the number of dead pixels needed before this happens varies between each manufacturer, so check with them before you order if you're concerned.

Some lazy pixels can be bought back to life occasionally. Playing some fast paced games for a while, and massaging / flicking the pixel area with a lint free cloth can sometimes help revive the lazy pixel, but not in all cases.

If you still have a dead pixel problem, can't bring it back to life and can't RMA it under warranty then you can sometimes return it to the stockist if you purchased it online. If you bought online you can take advantage of the "Distance Selling Act" which entitles you to return any item within 7 days as you were not present at the time of purchase. If you are not happy with your TFT you can return it at your cost of postage and often claim a refund or exchange. However, be aware that a lot of places will try and charge you restocking fees and they will almost certainly specify the goods must be packaged and in the same condition as when you received it, so be careful to package it back up nicely. Legally, if the stocker accepts the TFT back as a return governed by the Distance Selling Act, then they are NOT allowed to charge you a restocking fee as covered in the Governement Regulations (page 11 in particular). This selling act is not qidely known by retailers, but does exist if you really need to use it. You should only have to pay for postage to send it back to them.


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Q. So Which Is The Best TFT To Get?

This question pops up ALL the time! It really depends on what you want the TFT for, how much you want to pay etc. Performance varies with different panel technologies and with different specs. Check out the TFT Selector which will hopefully help you decide on the screen which suits your needs. You also need to base your decision on the looks of the TFT, any extra functions which you might find useful, and the price.


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Q. Where Can I See User's Pictures Of Their TFT's?

A. Try this thread on Overclockers... there's loads of good pics of people’s setups.
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Belinea 102035W / 102030W
20 inch Widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 8ms G2G response time, 800:1 contrast ratio, 300 cd/m2 brightness, 170 / 170 viewing angles, DVI and VGA connections
Features: Height adjustment, 4 port USB 2.0 hub and integrated speakers


102035w.jpg


Belinea have long been known as a provider of budget TFT models, and have had little impact in the mainstream enthusiast market. However, the new 102035W is the first screen on the market to use AU Optronics' 8ms G2G response time, 20" Widescreen, P-MVA panel (M201EW01 V0). This is the larger version of the already infamous 8ms P-MVA panel used in the 19" market in such models as the Viewsonic VP191B, Xerox XA7-192i and Dell 1905FP. The larger 20" WS version was eagerly anticipated and Belinea have managed to provide it to the public first.

The panel is essentially a larger panel matrix version of the 19" M190EN03 V0, and offers an 8ms response time achieved through the use of AU Optronics' well controlled overdrive technology. This was the first panel in the 20" market to really offer a low response time, and this makes the screen suited well for gaming if you want to reach outside the 17" and 19" market. Combine this with good colour reproduction, smooth movie playback and truly wide viewing angles (thanks to the P-MVA panel technology) and you have the makings of an excellent screen. There have been some reports of backlight bleeding due to poor build quality from Belinea, but the price is cheap and small defects are to be expected really. Note that there is a VGA only version, the 102030W which was released to help keep costs low and avoid the import taxes which DVI monitors will soon face.

Official Belinea Spec


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Reviews:

BwHardware Review (April 2006)
BeHardware Review (Nov 2005)
Prad.de Review (Dec 2005)

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Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >

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User Comments:


BEHARDWARE: "Sober, elegant, cheap, the 10 20 35W also includes all the required inputs. There is analog, DVI, sound (it includes speakers for basic sound) and four USB hub ports on top. (Out of the box, without calibration) Average DeltaE Belinea 10 20 35W = 6.5. For comparision with several monitors of reference: Average DeltaE (S-PVA 6 ms panel) = 2.7, Average DeltaE Eizo S2110W (S-PVA 8 ms panel) = 1.4. Behardware accuracy Belinea 10 20 35W = 15 %. (After calibration) Average DeltaE Belinea 10 20 35W = 0.4. The Belinea 10 20 35W’s standard brightness is 340 d/m² with a black at 0.5 cd/m² (680:1 contrast ratio).

(Movies) As usual with overdrive panels there is a twinkling effect, less than the IPS (LG L2040P being compared) but much more than MVA 25ms panels. We don’t miss the MVA 25ms as these monitors had very high afterglow effects. Our first expectation was in reaction time. For this aspect it’s a real success, and they are comparable to the previous fast VA 17, 19 and 24" monitors we tested. They have similar viewing angles and reaction time in games."


LLAMAHUNTER: "Only slight gripe is the odd placement of the USB ports (fairly inaccessible round the back), weak speakers (well in fairness wasn't expecting them to be up to much) and the fact I had to download drivers from Maxdata's FTP site. Tested the monitor with a few movies and games after some speculative calibration (brightness is especially high out the box). The panel itself seems very responsive didn't notice any discernable ghosting, I am guessing people that are ultra sensitive might be able to detect some ghosting with certain colour transitions. Proving to be excellent for web browsing and general office use, text and images are sharp and the contrast seems very good. Did feel the BeHardware review was a little overly critical on colours - just requires a bit of calibration to get a much more satisfactory result.


SKYLINE: "i have loads of these in stock and can say on desktop performance I am impressed but using the DVI cable playing a DVD wasnt the best.. Got a fair bit of grey ghosting against black... (Was 5th Element space battle) and the performance in far cry wasn't that great looked a bit jerky even tried vertical sync off and on and a fair few other settings. As said the USB Ports are in a silly place but I think they are aimed at people plugging in Mouse and keyboard rather than USB sticks or other detachable devices. Found the DVI Cable a little fiddly to get in. Also putting the stand into the correct position is pretty scary (You have to bend it backwards, then it gets to a point and you have to then force it even further"


JAMANIO: "The image quality on the Belinea is superior to the Dell (even on Analogue compared to Dells DVI). The colours are great and vibrant and "owns" my mid range CRT. The build quality and overall looks were better on the Dell, but only slightly. The Belinea does not have the option to show screens in letter box format, it always stretches a smaller image to fill the screen. The Dell you could stretch or play a game with borders. I can still see motion bluring in games like BF2, WOW etc, but the IQ is so much better I may be able to forgive."


SGOATY: "I viewed the three pics on the monitor review template all colours including white are vivid crisp and clear. Black is really good for a TFT backlight bleed is present but minimal. I have yet to see any ghosting although there is a fair bit of tearing most noticeable in the Matrix video. I think this may be to do with the settings on my 6600GT as I watched a HD trailer for T2 with my 7800GTX and never seen any tearing at all. I had a quick blast of BF2 in single player and adjusted my resolution using the shortcut the game looked fine at that resoloution and everything played as well as my 13ms 17" TFT there was just more screen. My 7800 GTX still runs everything at max with this resolution which is nice! Build quality overall seems very good although the buttons on the front feel a little cheap."

CRAGNUT: "I haven't noticed any ghosting as yet and DVD playback appears to bring a clear crisp image, going from a 17" CRT I was a little apprehensive but none of my fears have been realised, and all this just using the VGA connection, can't wait till I pick up a cable to try the DVI."

JBECK: " Hi, just received mine today. Have to say the picture is just stunning, playing COD2 and HL2 is fantastic. I haven't noticed any blurring at all. My backlight doesn't seem too bad but it is bleeding ever so slightly from the corners but more form the top left. Zero dead pixels too. The bleed isn't too bad so far, I have turned the brightness right down though as it was burning my eyes out. I have to say that the picture/build quality, Maxdata's excellent backup and the sheer sexiness of the thing out weighs the backlight bleed, highly recommended."

GRAPHICSXP: "Iit's not good enough for me in FPS games. Apart of that, the screen is the best one I've ever had for everything else. If you mostly want a screen to surf the web, watch DVD's/DivX, or even play games like WoW or the likes, then this screen will dramatically improve the experience!"


PRAD.DE: "The reproducible colour space of the Belinea 102035W is fairly large and the colour fidelity can be regarded as good. Therefore, the quality of colours offered is more than sufficient for most types of applications. It is only the more professional domains where this display would be rather unsuited, e.g. in such demanding fields of application as picture editing. In fast paced first person shooters, the Belinea 102035W showed no perceivable amount of ghosting and also no bright borders in front of quickly moving objects as it sometimes can be observed with other displays sporting Overdrive. Hence, the Overdrive technology utilized in this case works very well balanced and is about comparable to what we have seen on the Eizo S1910. Motion blurring, which due to the underlying technological principle all LCD displays show, becomes apparent with the Belinea, too. Due to the MVA panel teamed with Overdrive, the overall responsiveness can be rated as good and the amount of motion blurring is rather limited. The monitor can be categorized as an all-rounder and is in our opinion very well suited for gaming purposes.

(Movie Playback) Fine colour gradients and grey shades are displayed neatly by the MVA panel. Thanks to the deep black level, darker movie passages are well depicted, too. Scenes containing fog or blizzards are tackled flawlessly by this monitor. The fact that there is no streaking or ghosting visible in hectic scenes or rapid camera panning can be thanked to Overdrive. On the whole, the Belinea 102035W completed our DVD playback test with excellence.

The Belinea 102035W delivers an excellent bang for the buck. Its image quality is convincing and even fast moving content poses no serious challenge for this model, which is something that can be ascribed to Overdrive. The quality of fabrication proves convincing despite the low price. Basically, we were unable to find anything that would have really bugged us with this monitor. On a critical remark one could mention the spartanic functionality in terms of ergonomics. With this model, one will have to do without features like height adjustment or pivot. Another thing that should at least be pointed out is the hard to reach USB port and the missing DVI cable. However, at such a bargain price one needs to accept certain compromises which, from our point of view, are really easy to get over."



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Dell 2407WFP
24 inch Widescreen. 1920 x 1200 resolution, 6ms G2G Response Time, 1000:1 Contrast Ratio, 450 cd/m2 brightness, 178/178 Viewing Angles, DVI and VGA Connections
Pivot, Rotate, Tilt and Height Adjustments. Component, composite, S-Video inputs. USB 2.0 hub (4 ports) and 9-in-1 Card Reader. HDCP Support over DVI, 1:1 Pixel Mapping and Aspect Retention Supported


2407_2.jpg


Dell have updated their very successful and well established 2405FPW with a new design and updated spec. Much like the 2007WFP and 3007WFP, the 2407WFP features a new stand and more sleek appearance. Along with these changes, Dell have utilised Samsung's new 6ms G2G rated S-PVA panel which had already been introduced in the Acer AL2416W. This offers most notably an improved response time as compared with the 2405 (rated as 12ms G2G), and shows some marked improvement in real use and gaming. The panel is in line with Samsung's other 6ms range like the Samsung 970P which showed an improved performance when compared with Samsung's 16ms and 8ms generation of PVA panels.

Apart from the improved responsiveness, the performance of the panel remains relatively unchanged. Colour quality is more aimed at the gamers and average users out there as opposed to professional photo workers, with more vivid and bright colours being offered as default. Still, with some calibration the panel is still certainly capable of producing some nice accurate colours for those who need them. Viewing angles are wide, but some may find them a little more restrictive than S-IPS panels which are more impressive in this area. Contrast shift is noticeable to some users when shifting away from the central viewing angle, and is a characteristic of PVA and MVA panels due to their crystal alignment. You generally don't hear much about this though and is not really bothersome to most average users at all. Movie playback is sadly a little noisy as is common with Samsung's PVA panels in most cases. However, a screen this size easily affords you the option of sitting a metre or two away from the screen which makes any twinkling almost unnoticeable.

You may well have heard stories about Dell's new range and some issues with banding of colours across gradients, as well as reports about text blurring. These issues have pretty much been eliminated since early revisions of the screen were initially released in Japan and USA. The UK stock features the updated firmware (revisions A01 onwards) and so do not be put off by reports of these issues. If you're buying this screen from elsewhere, ensure that you do not receive the early A00 version. For a detailed article about the Dell 2xx7WFP range, please see here. This covers the changes in the models, the early issues with the screen (colour banding, text blurring) as well as an in depth look at it's features including response time and HDCP / High-Def support.


Official Dell Spec

< Images >

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Reviews:

BeHardware Review (July 2006)
Bit-Tech Review
(June 2006)
Trusted Reviews, Review (June 2006)
PC Pro Review (Sept 2006)
PC Authority Review (June 2006)
ActiveWin Review (2006)
CNET Review (June 2006)


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User Comments:

BEHARDWARE:
"The Samsung (244T) is less accurate with standard adjustments than the Dell, but after calibration – as we saw on the colour scale patterns of the previous test – it finally reaches a higher level. Its gamut is a little wider and it can display details that are invisible on the Dell. For the 16ms panel (Dell 2405FPW), the afterglow is very strong and bothersome. For the 6ms, it has considerably diminished to come back to a much more reasonable level.... (Movies) Rendering is standard and typical of PVA panels with wide viewing angles and reduced afterglow, but with strong twinkling. There are also overly strong colours when they aren't adjusted; green for the dell and red for Samsung…To benefit from SD and HD sequences, if possible step back at least two meters from the monitor. Viewing angles are very good, and up until 100° colours are almost as bight as for IPS monitors. Beyond 100°, however, colour intensity decreases faster. IPS monitors have (as written in their characteristics) almost total viewing angles, while PVA monitors do not."

BIT-TECH: "We had no qualms over the on-screen display on the Dell. The menu system is accessed by buttons on the bottom right, and it's very easy just to scroll through. The OSD gives you cues as to which input is currently connected when the display switches, and overall it's very slick. Adjusting picture quality is a clincher, although there isn't quite as much control as we would have liked over colour temperatures and tints - you're going to need to put in some work in your graphics card control panel if you're not one for just unpacking the monitor and letting it be. (Colour banding issue) Although we did see problems, they weren't as serious as some have been reporting. The problems highlighted by DisplayMate did uncover some banding issues - these were apparent in the 256-level Intensity Colour Ramp test using the monitor's Desktop mode. The problems were even worse when we tried out the Multimedia and Gaming modes.

(Video) Again, we saw quality here on par with the best we've seen. Our SuperBit DVD of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon contains a particularly difficult treetop scene, which mixes bright sky, leaves, and water with subtle skin and cloth tones. Many displays make a total mess of this, with the greens in particular looking garish. However, the Dell certainly had the colour reproduction spot on, making this a pleasure to watch. (Gaming) We ramped up both F.E.A.R. and Quake 4 to test how the display coped with fast-paced, black-heavy action. We were very impressed. Many poor monitors end up just displaying a murky black mess in these games, unable to cope with the subtle differences in blacks and shadows throughout the levels. However, the Dell was able to do well here, with gaming clear and sharp. We saw no response time issues, and the colour brightness and quality was amongst the best we've seen. You won't see any of the compression or banding problems in the midst of a hectic fire fight. (Desktop) We used the monitor just in and out of Windows (and OSX, too). Text was sharp and crisp, and we had no complaints about the quality of the DVI connection.


TRUSTED REVIEWS: "Working with large high-res images, I actually couldn’t see any effects of the banding, but colours and details did look subdued compared to the best I’ve seen. Comparing with other monitors it was a little like the difference between 16-bit and 32-bit colour, though not nearly as extreme. However, it’s still an issue and if colour accuracy is important in your line of work then I wouldn’t recommend this screen.
I then tested by watched a Superbit version of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon on DVD and then I tried some downloaded HD movie files. All appearing striking and smooth, with no hint of response time issues and there was detail in dark scenes despite the lack-lustre DisplayMate performance. Playing a fast action game, Counter-Strike: Source, was also a great experience. In these kind of conditions minor banding issue just aren’t noticeable. Xbox 360 images also looked great when hooking up via component. It’s undeniable though that while overall performance is very good, if we’re pernickety - and we should be - the Dell quite doesn’t match up to the image quality of the Samsung 244T. The Dell does have a built in USB hub and card reader, which are very useful, but for those whom picture quality is an absolute priority that’s not really going to be enough to draw people away from the Samsung.


DRAGONHUNTER: "...Shows no sign of doing anything that flat panels do. its sharp in films and games, there's no (to me anyway) form of ghosting/after image blur. out of the box settings has brightness at 50, I dropped it to 40 after playing oblivion for a bit and the dark places were a bit ... not very dark.... and now its good. This thing beats all the other displays I've seen, mainly VX912/924 and last year's Xerox."

ANOTHER_MOOK: "For CS, yes, buy it now!!! If you have a decent graphics card, it is simply stunning and I couldn't go back to my CRT. A mate of mine was actually shocked at how amazing it looked! However, with DVD quality video I do get some pretty bad banding (apparently this is to be expected) but it is better than my CRT in other ways... I do still watch video on my Dell over my CRT, despite the banding, but I can't say it looks brilliant."

KEOGH: "(Colour test pictures) The image appears very vivid, crisp and clear. Although if looked at closely, the colour palette has a slight bleeding around each colour block. Although this is not very noticeable, and only seen if you look closely. Does not noticeably tend towards red or blue! Overall fantastic! (Doom 3 test picture) Can’t see any problems with this picture, this is as close to perfect as you can get. Also I have played Doom 3 on this monitor and it plays games PERFECTLY. Especially if you can be bothered to switch it to “Gaming Mode”, but games still look great in “Desktop Mode”. GREAT TFT for gaming! Ok, I’ve so far played Hitman Blood Money, Doom 3 and F.E.A.R on this monitor. There is no noticeable ghosting or any other issues that would affect the game play on any of these games. I’ve played most of these games on my 19” Sony Trinitron CRT, and if anything the games run better on the 2407. If you like gaming and want this TFT you will NOT be disappointed I can assure you that. The games run perfectly at the native res of 1920x1200 and also stretch and fit well with lower widescreen resolutions too.

(Uniformity test black back ground) This image appears completely black in the middle and gets slightly lighter around the edges. The bottom right hand corner is the most noticeably lightest. (Image Clarity) I have no problems here… the text is very clear and crisp in my opinion and no one should experience any problems. ClearType, if anything makes the text more unreadable, as it blurs far too much. (DVI vs VGA) I have just tried Hitman Blood Money in VGA mode also, and to be honest I can’t see any difference between this and DVI? If you where to play in both without any knowledge of what connection you where playing it on, you would not be able to tell the difference. With regards to the desktop, there is no way anyone could tell the difference!

(Matrix movie trailer) This was exceptional! The trailer really jumped out at me and looked really, really clear and crisp. I watched it 3 times to carefully examine the movie and I did not notice ONE instance of ghosting or smearing. If I had to pick at something, it would be the fact that the blacks may have been a bit to dark, and detail was lost slightly (namely looking at Neo’s cloak). Even stretched fully to 1920x1200 this trailer looked good… slight blurring, but that can be expected I suppose. Overall this was very impressive! After viewing the Matrix trailer I chucked a DVD on, as with the trailer I was very impressed with this. I must admit I have never seen a movie look so good, the trailer was good, but the DVD’s where outstanding. Oddly the blacks on the DVD where fine! If you like watching movies then I can not recommend this monitor enough… I am still honestly quite shocked how good they looked"
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Belinea 2225S1W
22 inch widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 5ms response time, 1000:1 contrast ratio, 300 cd/m2, 160/160 viewing angles, VGA connection only
Integrated speakers, tilt functionality


belinea_2225s1w.jpg


The first offering from Belinea in the growing 22" market is their 2225S1W, utilising a 5ms rated TN Film panel from AU Optronics. While the 22" marker is limited to TN Film only (at the time of writing), it is important to realise the variety of panels being used, some from Samsung, CMO and AU Optonics. AUO have always been one of the more reliable of the panel manufacturers in the industry, and the specification of their offering is certainly with the time. The screen is reasonably limited in its functionality featuring only a basic tilt function as far as movement goes. The screen is VESA 100m compliant though, and features integrated speakers for those wanting to supply those basic office sounds.

One thing to understand regarding the 22" market is that the models still only offer the same resolution (1680 x 1050) as that available from 20"WS models. However, the image quality is still fine, and the extra size can have its benefits in terms of immersion in gaming, and for watching movies. Responsiveness is decent enough from this TN Film offering, but as you might expect, viewing angles are quite limited and movie playback a little noisy. The screen offers VGA connectivity only, but modern VGA connections tend to be very good, so probably not a big issue considering the price of this model is very nice.

Official Belinea Spec


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Reviews:

BeHardware Review (Dec 2006)
Widescreengamingforum User Review (Nov 2006)


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User Comments:

KAMI: "Just tried the speakers they're actually better than I expected, lack bass of course but that's because they're tiny. Fine for anyone who casually farts about in games or just wants windows alerts. Not for gamers or anyone listening to music. Vertical viewing angle isn't huge but the horizontal seems to be pretty wide for such a large, cheap monitor. It seems to hold it's colours very well across the monitor, I can't notice any obvious changes although I couldn't in the Philips 190S either. We use Dell TFTs at work, 17 > 20.1 inch. This one is on a par with them, I don't love the speakers at the bottom but they're a decent quality and at least it's not a massive bar along the bottom, doesn't look "wrong". Overall I'm very, very happy with it. I really can't find fault with it, I don't have any games installed on the PC at the moment but I'm not really worried about it, DVDs playback is fine so I reckon games will be too."

CHAOS: "I got one of these monitors today and im very happy with it, I was surprised how big it was. For the price its excellent, it looks better in real life than the pics I had seen, the pics make it look cheap and plasticy but it looks a lot better in the flesh. Played some HD videos and they look great, and played some Half Life 2 and it was excellent, no issues. My desktop text was a bit weird at first, but I set sharpness to 5 and its perfect. So all in all in my opinion its a great display for the price."

BEHARDWARE: "The ergonomics are basic and correspond to the low price of the monitor. The foot is basic and doesn’t allow any adjustments (pivot height). It doesn´t have a USB hub, a DVI input and it isn´t HDCP compatible. The initial color rendering is satisfactory on average but we can’t really call it "good". The only practical aspect is that the monitor features a pair of low quality speakers. This is enough for the occasional video....The six monitors tested are equipped with TN panels. They are easily recognisable as their lower vertical viewing angle darkens and this is the case here. However, the latest generation of TN panels can be equipped with filters to improve the side viewing angle. Only one monitor – the AU-Optronics (Belinea) – seems to have this filter."
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
NEC LCD20WGX2
20 inch Widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 6ms G2G Response Time, 700:1 Contrast Ratio, 470 cd/m2 Brightness, 178/178 Viewing Angles, DVI and VGA Connections
Tilt and Pivot Functions, 4 port USB 2.0 Hub, Advanced DVM (1600:1 Contrast Ratio) and OptiClear Glossy Screen


nec_20wgx2.jpg


NEC have been quiet for a couple of years really in the main stream TFT market, but have come back with a new 20" WS model with an impressive spec. Using LG.Philips' AS-IPS (Advanced Super In Plane Switching) technology and their own Advanced DVM (aka DFC) they have listed this monitor at a very impressive 6ms G2G response time, as well as with a contrast ratio of up to 1600:1! The NEC 20WGX2 is the first model to feature these technologies and marks the re-emergence of IPS technology into the main stream market, which has been somewhat quiet while TN Film, PVA and MVA panels have continued to develop.

The response time has actually been boosted quite considerably since the previous generation of 16ms S-IPS panels which became popular in models like the Dell 2001FP and 2005FPW. User reports are that this is a vast improvement with responsiveness being on par with even the fastest TN film panels like the Viewsonic VX922! This really is a break through since previous IPS generations were far from the most responsive panels in the market. LG.Philips haven't released hardly any information about what they have done to achieve these new response times, but we can only assume at this stage that overdrive has been well used to boost grey transitions and really improve gmaing performance. Add to this the truly wide viewing angles (even a little better than PVA and MVA screens) and a true 8 bit colour depth and you have an extremely impressive screen. Black depth is not quite on par with VA panel variants, and movie playback is fairly noisy unfortunately. This is a draw back of a lot of newer screens, and isn't helped by the aggressive use of overdrive which can often accentuate this problem.

Some people may find the OptiClear glossy finish (similar to Sony's X-Black filter) a little too reflective, but it all comes down to individual taste at the end of the day. Reflections are noticeable in certain lighting conditions and movie playback suffers a little because of it.

Official Spec


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Reviews:

BeHardware Review (Feb 2006)
TFT Central In Depth Review (Igor Stankovic - Feb 2006)
FiringSquad Review (March 2006)
Bit-tech Review (March 2006)


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Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >


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User Comments:

BEHARDWARE: (From French Site, translated): "NEC lists the screen at 700:1 contrast ratio. However, that to arrive at such a rate of contrast, NEc did not improve its level of black. It is always a little less deep than that of PVA screens; and it reaches a value of about 0,4 cd/m² here, which represents and improvement over the preceding IPS panels. They have really pushed the brightness though. They announce 470 cd/m². One measures in fact 430 cd/m² with the adjustments by default. It is much too high. It is a little like putting a lamp full power in front of your eyes and lowering the brightness setting not only makes it much more comfortable for use, it actually helps improve the colour reproduction....The NEC offers some of the best colour reproduction with default values, and once calibrated offers even better values.

The NEC features a glossy screen coating with the major disadvantage of this surface being that it looks often like a mirror. In most uses you will not find this a problem since your eyes will focus on the content of the screen instead. In gaming you will forget about it, apart from when you pass through a dark area when you may then notice your reflection. It is especially problematic in films since you can clearly see your reflection in the screen. The only way to get round this is to watch the film in the dark.

We placed the screen in clone mode with the Viewsonic VX922 (2ms TN Film) and chose a resolution of 1280 x 1024 on the NEC to compare them both. The results are impressive, both screens are very similar! It is more reactive than the Belinea 102035W, but is this a gamers screen? The widescreen format might not be that great for first person shooters, but strategy games are certainly well suited. The glossy coating is not really an issue since you don't normally notice it, but sometimes you can easily see your reflection. The screen is as responsive as the Viewsonic VX922 and Hyundai Q90U in Pixperan flag tests and is much better than the old IPS panels like that used in the 18ms rated LaCie 319. The Belinea is not much slower, but there is a little noticeable difference. In black to white transitions the screen is a little slower than the TN Film panels but at the same level as the Belinea 102035W. Video is sadly very noisy, even more than some TN Film panels. You also need to watch movies in the dark to avoid mirror like reflections on the screen. Viewing angles are very wide, even more so than the Belinea 102035W."



IGORS: "I noticed no tearing, ghosting, latency or blurring whatsoever. It's probably directly influenced by the panel's fast response time. I tried FEAR, HL2, Far Cry ... everything was smooth and a pleasure to play. I have to admit that widescreen field of view is amazing. Again, colour reproduction was perfect. When I opened the AOE3 menu screen, the level of details, contrast and colour richness were simply astonishing. Half Life 2 in 1680x1050 with HDR and 16:10 aspect ratio was real joy to play Also, Call Of Duty 2 experience was superb. While focusing on those single objects (for instance a tree in a game) and strafing (really fast) there was noticeable loss of texture sharpness. It's not drastic at all and without your hint I doubt that I will notice this normally (while focusing on global scenery). Also, this is more visible when you are REALLY close to the object. When you are looking from a moderate distance, it's definitely almost unnoticeable. I have just finished the session in DOOM 3 in full wide screen 1680x1050 glory. Don't know the FPS, but is was smooth as a silk. It was ridiculously good! I can't get enough of this monitor!

I tried several titles for now, including DivX/DVD and ... again perfect. I tried dark and very bright scenes and they looked great. Dark scenes are surprisingly good, even better than on my home theatre Sony Bravia 32" LCD TV. There was no visible "greyness" in the dark scenes. Also, bright scenes were very vivid and colour reproduction was very good. It seems that sRGB is producing much more realistic colours. Didn't have time to test several movie titles, but I immediately noticed that dark scenes are very good. I tested the screen with Kung Fu Hustle, which is an excellent test for the monitor response times, as it's packed with the fast action sequences. The NEC digested everything without a single hitch. Didn't notice any blurring or tearing. Some people may be disappointed with the video playback, as pixel pitch is present and glossy screen is problematic when there is intensive ambient light.

For Gaming, I was using Advanced DVM + GAMING profile and for the Video Advanced DVM + VIDEO profile. Now, without the Advanced DVM, the screen is much brighter but it's loosing that "fine" contrast detail. Saying that, final picture quality is very customisable and I suppose it can suit to everyone's taste. The Video & Gaming profiles are very similar ... however Gaming will give you little bit more brightness and colour richness.

The glossy screen is maybe problematic when there is a presence of bright ambient light in front of the screen ... but again it's just matter of personal taste. I don't find it very distracting personally. As this is a subjective matter, maybe this doesn't deserve the global minus. At the end of the day, it's improving the smoothness of the screen, as well as colour & contrast balance. As a general guideline, I would not recommend serious "dark" gaming or "dark" movie playback VERY close to this monitor and in the very bright ambient light (in front of the screen). As gaming/video immersion factor is much higher in dark or semi-dark environments, I think that the glossy screen shouldn't represent a problem for most of you out there."


NUTSTER: "Got mine today.. love it! Everything is sooo much sharper and crisper than my old CRT's. Even though it has just as much vertical screen space as my 19" CRT, its quite low down, so feels smaller for some odd reason.. its not though. Need to get a stand for it, that's my only criticism. The DVM modes work great. Currently just got it on out the box settings with some Digital Vibrance on to up the colour depth a bit. Played some CS:S in 1680x1050 mode, looks awesome.. Very slight twinkling effect on things like leaves and stuff. Whereas on a CRT that would all be blurred together it aint on a TFT.. so high frequency stuff looks a bit noisy... easily solved with some Transparency AA."


FIRING SQUAD: "As a gaming monitor, the NEC 20WMGX2 had a respectable PixPerAn score of 13. At peak brightness, however, the monitor had excellent color accuracy. Although the Samsung 244T edged NEC out in terms of color accuracy, the high contrast and high-brightness of the image made an ideal monitor for gaming. Photographers requiring color-critical work may find the advanced DV mode to be a bit distracting and the standard display to lack sufficient contrast. The 20WMGX2 was clearly designed for gamers rather than photographers. The NEC 20WMGX2 was also a superb monitor. While we didn't get the same pixel refresh performance as the HP f2105, the NEC still represents an improvement over the previous monitors we've tested. Of the 20" monitors, color accuracy was best on the NEC. The video input was better than the Samsung 244T but we'd prefer the Gateway FPD2185W for video use."

RICHDOG: "I did test it for a good few hours and here's my opinion... it looks ****-hot. I'd never seen a 20.1" widescreen in the flesh before and wow it is REALLY wide, I can imagine all games that support it looking completely bloomin' awesome on it and can't wait to fire some up! Colour reproduction and blacks, again wow, I never imagined it would be that good. Blacks are deep and velvety, yes gents that means "CRT black", as if the screen were off, simply amazing. With no tweaking whatsoever the colours also looked fantastic, rich and even. The monitor also has a feature called "Advanced DV" and this further dims the backlight to create greater contrast and colour depth, it also adjusts intelligently depending on what you are viewing. White text pages will dim to reduce glare, and dark pages will do the opposite. From what I saw it really looks to be a top feature of this monitor. The OSD options are many and highly tweakable, for those that can't abide "stretching" in games that won't work with widescreen, the monitor scaled down to 1280*1024 on a 1:1 pixel resolution, meaning no blur whatsoever, razor sharp. I fired up MOH (our work LAN game of choice) and with a eye beadier than that of Sauron I strafed about like a loon and popped off a few guards. Ghosting is something I've always imagined with horror, a bit like waking up with your friends fat mother. However I am happy to report that in the 15 minutes I played it I, a fussy sod at the best of times, detected no noticeable ghosting whatsoever, and only minimal "blur" which is inevitable. It's a fast screen, and I can't wait to play away on it. One last note the screen is very reflective, you will not to be able to use it with a light source facing it, it's best viewed in darkness or with a lamp behind the monitor and you'll be fine. For you WOW players who live in airless pits and last saw daylight a year or two ago this will not bother you."




==========================
Dell 2007WFP
20 inch Widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 16ms Response Time, 800:1 Contrast Ratio, 300 cd/m2 Brightness, 178/178 Viewing Angles, DVI and VGA Connections
Tilt, height, swivel and rotate functionality. USB Hub, S-Video, Composite Connections
HDCP Support over DVI, 1:1 pixel mapping supported


1.jpg


Dell have built on the great success of the 2005FPW with a new design and somewhat updated specification. Sticking with S-IPS panel technology from LG.Philips, the response time is listed as a modest 16ms implying over driving circuitry (ODC) has not been used by the panel manufacturer as common trends might dictate. Contrast ratio has been boosted from 600:1 to 800:1, HDCP support has been added over DVI, and apart from that the main changes are simply cosmetic. Dell have followed up on the new design from their 3007WFP and the stand has changed as you can see from the various pictures here supplied by Dell. They have thankfully kept the wealth of inputs including S-Video and Composite connections and the screen also offers Picture In Picture (PiP) and Picture By Picture (PbP).

It has been reported that there are two different panels being used, both based on S-IPS technology from LG.Philips. Some US and Japanese users seem to have received the LM201WE2 panel while others have received the LM201W01, albeit updated and improved since it's used in the 2005FPW. Regardless, in practice the monitor is impressive offering obvious improvements in responsiveness over its predecessor. It isn't quite as fast as other modern IPS panels like the NEC LCD20WGX2 for example, but it is impressive, being comparable to the 8ms P-MVA generation (Belinea 102035W and Viewsonic VX2025WM for instance). Being S-IPS it also offers good colour accuracy and wide viewing angles, wider than VA panels in fact.

Perhaps the main gripe with the 2007WFP since its release has been reports of banding on colour gradients. This issue has also been widely reported on the larger 2407WFP and discussed more in depth here. The issue was acknowledged by Dell and the Faroudja Video Processing was blamed. This was subsequently turned off in the 'desktop' preset mode which almost completely eliminated any banding problems. Some users still notice it as an issue, but to be honest you would really need to go looking for it to notice it. Unless you're a professional graphics worker and need absolute spot on colours, it's not going to be an issue now that the new revisions (since A01) of the monitor are being supplied.


Official Dell Spec

< Images >


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Reviews:

BeHardware Review (June 2006)
Prad.de Review (April 2006)


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Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >

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User Comments:

BEHARDWARE:
"Another surprise, the pictures (of PixPerAn) report an excellent behaviour for the Dell monitor, comparable to the NEC 20WGX² with its 6ms IPS panel. This results is very surprising because the 2007WFP panel isn’t the same as the NEC monitor, at least for the product received. If you forget about the above pictures (which aren’t scientific proof) and are there to illustrate our articles and impressions in concrete tests, the 2007WFP doesn’t behave as well as the 20WGX², or as bad as the previous 2005FPW. The reaction time of this monitor is in fact identical to P-MVA 8 ms monitors. In clone mode and with games, it is difficult to differentiate between the two because similar rendering (except if you take into account viewing angles)."


PRAD.DE: "The design of the Dell 2007WFP is appealing and comes across very noble. In terms of colour the monitor is laid-out in black and silver. The panel is framed by a 1.8 cm wide bezel. Both edges at the top and at the bottom of the chassis have a silver band; these bands are parts of the silver chassis shell on the rear.

(note: Review before firmware fix for banding issue) Since the 2007WFP doesn't offer any contrast settings in digital mode, we tried changing contrast and gamma values via the colour settings of the graphics card driver in such a way that the colour and grey shades of the test pictures were displayed without banding. While we did manage to improve it to some degree, we weren't able to obtain results without any banding. The amount of banding is pronounced slightly only and hardly noticeable. With dark colours, we sometimes saw a weak glittering (crystal effect). Subjectively perceived, however, the image quality is very good for the most part. The colour measurements we've taken give evidence of this impression....Dell claims the contrast ratio to be 800:1. In practice, the display reaches a good black level.

Contrast actually remains fairly stable until about 170 degrees, which is where the effect of colours looking washed out becomes increasingly apparent. The viewing angle perspective from above, however, is an exception to this, as substantial shifts in colour start to unearth from viewing angles of around 150 to 160 degrees on. We rate the brightness uniformity of the review unit as good. At close inspection, one can observe some very faint lucencies in the upper left and lower right corner. But this will probably go unnoticed when working under work conditions / ambient lighting. It should be pointed out here that the brightness uniformity in LCD devices is always subject to some degree of spread for standard factory models.

The responsiveness of the Dell 2007WFP ranks quite well. Only fast paced games, like the first person shooter DOOM III for example, reveal a minor amounts of ghosting in very hectic battle scenes. Just as every other LCD monitor, the Dell 2007WFP too shows a certain degree of motion blur, too; this is inherent to LCD monitors, as they fall into the category of Hold-Type displays. Knowing from previous experiences that particularly hardcore gamers are very picky as far as responsiveness is concerned, we consider this monitor not to be suitable for hardcore gamers. Therefore, we recommend this user group rather go for one of the recent 19 inch fast TN panel sporting displays....The quality of the Dell 2007WFP's interpolation is very good. Overall, the loss in detail and focus caused by interpolation turns out to be marginal. The picture is displayed slightly stretched. This is where Dell ought to do some touching up and should consequently release a firmware update.

(Movies) The image quality achieved in PC mode is very good. Subtle colour gradients and shades of grey are depicted neatly. Dark movie passages, fog, snow flurry, or glare effects pose no problem at all for the Dell 2007WFP. The S-IPS panel of the Dell 2007WFP proves up to depicting fast action scenes, cuts, or camera pannings without any traceable amount ghosting occurring."


REDEYE: "It's a A02 and am happy to say no dead pixels, no banding problems, bleed or any type of defect. I was a bit concerned about the 16ms response but after I had a bit of a tryout this afternoon on COD 2, COD, Far Cry and Battlefield 2 I'm happy to say no lag or motion blur at all. Colours are really good, DVD's are crisp and HD content looks rather nice! My usual monitor is a Viewsonic VP730 and I think the Dell is pretty much on par in games/ DVD's etc. No problems in Photoshop, colours again look as they should and the extra workspace is great."


DAVIDSTONE28: "The motion blur on PixPiperAn is not a particularly noticeable improvement on my 20ms Hydis based Acer (a superb panel in its day), although ALL TFT's have a degree of motion whether they're 2ms, 3ms, TN film or whatever. There are twinkling effects during video playback, although the effect is less noticeable the further away you sit from the screen. Details in dark areas of the screen aren't particularly well rendered though I yet to have an opportunity to properly calibrate the monitor. Having said that it is an improvement on my previous monitor....Not sure why they put silver edging on the top and bottom edges of the bezel - I find it slightly distracting when watching films. Initial thoughts are that its not a bad monitor - probably comparable to other monitors in the same price range such as the Viewsonic VX2025W, Philips 2006CS etc. I just think that TFT technology simply isn't a mature technology so maybe I'm expecting (CRT like picture) perfection where none exists."
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Viewsonic VX2025WM
20" Widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 8ms G2G response time, 800:1 contrast ratio, 300 cd/m2 brightness, 178 / 178 viewing angles
VGA and DVI input, built in speakers


vx2025wm.jpg


The Viewsonic VX2025WM follows in the footsteps of their 19" models like the VX910, VX912, VX924 and VX922. Viewsonic have opted to stick with the same design but extend it into the popular 20" widescreen sector. They have used the 8ms AU Optronics P-MVA which has already been introduced in the Belinea 102035W, an excellent all round panel which is making the most of the success which the 19" version had before it.

The design of the monitor is fairly simple, and perhaps a little outdated now, only featuring a tilt function as far as ergonomic adjustments go. It does include some built in speakers, but only really suitable for light office use as with any TFT speakers really. However, the panel does offer some excellent performance, offering some decent responsiveness thanks to AU Optronics' overdrive RTC application and Viewsonic's ClearMotiv technology. This decent responsiveness even comes without the sacrifices which the TN Film panels have to make. Viewing angles are wide, colour depth is at a true 8 bit level, black depth is good, and movie playback is pretty smooth too. This is a good alternative to the Belinea model, for those looking for a different design, and perhaps a more reliable build quality. One thing to note for those who are gamers, the TFT itself doesn't offer any 1:1 pixel matching for games which don't support WS resolution.

Official Viewsonic Spec


-------------------------------------------
Reviews:

BeHardware Review (April 2006)
Bit-Tech Review (March 2006)


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Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >


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User Pictures:

< Click Here >


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User Comments:

BIT-TECH: "The menu system, and the buttons to control it, are unintuitive and pretty horrid all round. Definitely the chink in an otherwise shiny piece of armour. Like most of the other monitors here, vertical tilt is all that you're going to get. However, in terms of reclaiming desk space, we like the fact that the stand is 'hollow', making a great place to put your pens and post-it notes. The brightness and viewing angle is a little worse here than on the NEC, which has the funky OptiClear coating. However, the picture is very good overall. The greys in our banding test had a slight blue tinge, but this is more of a 'characteristic' of the display, with a slight blue cast on whites giving a fairly good picture. The definition of individual shades at the ends of the scale was worse than on the NEC (LCD20WGX2), but it was crucially able to sustain a better balance between white and black than that display, giving it a better range of colour. We thought that whites looked better than blacks, and other colours were well balanced.

Proving that artificial tests aren't everything, we found this the best display for gaming, hands down. Playing our dark Quake level, we were able to pick out more detail than on any other display. There was a great differential of blacks, and the greys and whites were maintained at a good level. We maxed out the brightness and contrast and thought that the picture was as close to a good CRT as we've seen on a LCD. We thought the same about our video test. There was the most detail found in the picture than of any panel, and the most realistic blacks and greys. The colour was at a good level - not over saturated and not under bright. There seemed to be less grain and the whites were less blown out than on the NEC panel."


BEHARDWARE: "ViewSonic chose the MVA 8 ms late, but they benefited from an improved version of its standard colour quality. Reduce the brightness a little and it’s beautiful. Also, this monitor has a zero white and black dead pixel warranty....(Responsiveness) In second place are the MVA 8 ms panels, in wide format (Acer AL2051W, Belinea 10 20 30W, ViewSonic VX2025wm) and 4/3 (ViewSonic VP2030b). Afterglow is a little more noticeable than with NEC's (LCD 20WGX2) monitor, as we saw it without even looking for it. Nevertheless, we forget about it after a few minutes. A step behind are the TN panels, the 8ms of the BenQ FP202W and the 5ms Samsung 204B. The difference with MVA panels isn't huge, but it does exist. (Viewing angles) For the MVA, images are visible from almost any angles but their contrast ratio is lower as soon as we move from the central position. The monitors best for movies are still and always the AU-Optronics P-MVA's. We tested all scenes and they are the ones with the least twinkling effect. If you look for it you will notice it but after a while it goes away."

TEDMAUL: "The colours and general quality of the image is much much better than on my VX715, even when i initially fired it up using the VGA connection. Got it running DVI-D now and it's crystal clear. Not really noticed any ghosting, but then i think a lot of that is down to the person who is viewing the screen. I've never noticed it particularly on the 16ms VX715 either. Not noticed any backlight bleed or screen door effect in general use (windows/gaming)...Build quality is excellent, good picture quality and it's great to have all the extra space. Makes such a difference to run games in widescreen now, even though I've only had an hour or so to mess around with it.

KARANSAR: "HL2 and WOW are a delight to play in widescreen, you could almost call it surround-screen. I am no technophile, neither I should imagine, are some of the other guys here. So for the non techies like me: There is slight backlight bleed (I think) from the bottom right, when the screen is black. Can't see it otherwise. So no problem as far as I'm concerned. "Screen door effect"? If I've got it, I can't see it. Oh, I've watched a DVD and a d/loaded My Name Is Earl. Both were excellent on this screen. Coming from second hand 15" CRT, to a couple of second hand 17" CRTs, to a 17" Iiyama TFT, to this 20" Viewsonic, I can truly say that I'm more than happy with this monitor. If you're thinking about getting it, get it.

SANITYSTREAM (Hardforum): "As a PC monitor, the VX2025wm is great. If that's all you want it for, this is a fine monitor, everything is sharp, no backlight bleeding, no screen door effect, good colors, and games still play fine even below the native resolution of 1680x1050. It's a keeper in this regard.

CANNYDOG (Hardforum): "Again there is some lightness in the corners, but as Coldtronius describes it's not like the backlight bleeding that I've seen with other LCDs. Response times are a big improvement over my previous Samsung 191T+, or 192MP. I did some brief tests with a 3D screensaver, called Latice, and while I could detect a touch of ghosting it really isn't that bad. I don't currently play allot of games. But AoE3 recognized 1680x1050. I had read previously, in this thread that WoW, works with this aspect ratio. I played about 30 mins of Gladitor and didn't notice the twinkling that others have mentioned. So my best guess is that I'll be happy with a second one of these, for the system in my bedroom

COLDTRONIUS: (Hardform) "Sharpness: Razor sharp. Period. My desktop looks so nice and crisp its unreal, even the Dell didn't do it this good. Ghosting/Blurring: Initial testing shows very light ghosting in very fast movement, mostly in HL2 Deatmatch. Colors: Something viewsonic has always done well and the VX2025wm is no exception. A few little tweaks with the easy to use Viewsonic menu and easy button interface made colors so real and true. Can't wait to do some photoshop and Priemiere with it! ScreenDoor: Heard intital impressions here and at widescreen forums about screendoor effect. Quick initial testing through MY EYES shows little to none. I need to more playing with BF2 and fast paced gaming to verify this. So far, nothing to be concered and CRAP loads better then Dells 20005FWP. First inital frowning: No highth adjustment. I knew this from the start when buying it but the monitor sits pretty low in stock form. No rotation ability either. Dissapointing coming from Dells or other Viewsonic monitors. Will probably have to get some kinda stand for it to sit up higher. Portrait and picky LCD people, BE WARNED!!"

TOXIC: "...From what I've seen so far very little bleed, just a slight bit in the bottom right of the screen, but I can only see it slightly during boot-up and not at desktop or gaming. This image quality is just superb, better than my 913N and I'm loving this widescreen thing. Man its good. Gaming so far what what I've tried is very smooth. CSS looks just awesome in widescreen, I'm actually getting more benefit now from my 1900xtx playing at a greater resolution. Colours are good, slightly more faded than my 913N but I always thought that the colours with my Samsung monitor were to much and tried a bit to back them off. So far its excellent and I cant ask for more. It looks like a keeper."




==========================
Samsung 215TW
21 inch Widescreen. 1680 x 1050 resolution, 8ms G2G Response Time, 1000:1 Contrast Ratio, 300 cd/m2 Brightness, 178/178 Viewing Angles, VGA and DVI Connections
Height, pivot, rotate and tilt adjustments, built in speakers, S-Video and Component inputs
HDCP Support over DVI


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Samsung have exploited a relatively open sector of the market with the release of their 21" Samsung 215TW monitor. While the resolution remains the same as the 20"WS market, the extra inch in size can help add immersion to games, provide extra space for viewing movies and help make text that little bit bigger for those who find the 20" market text too small. The 215TW is built around Samsung's own LTM210M2 S-PVA panel, and the specs are certainly impressive. The monitor also offers a wealth of adjustments and inputs as detailed above making it a very versatile monitor.

Samsung have used their MagicSpeed overdrive technology to boost grey to grey transitions and in practice the screen is reported to offer comparable responsiveness to the 8ms P-MVA generation (Belinea 102035W and Viewsonic VX2025WM for instance). Contrast is good not only on paper, but in practice with high brightness and excellent black depth. Viewing angles are wider than TN Film models but remain a little behind S-IPS panels. If you're looking for a slightly larger screen with some very impressive ergonomic features then this is a good choice.

Official Samsung Spec


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Reviews:

Tom's Hardware Review (July 2006)
BeHardware Review (June 2006)
Bit-Tech Review (July 2006)
Trusted Reviews, Review (June 2006)

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Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >

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User Comments:

TOM'S HARDWARE: "The build quality is good, but the plastic used isn't very attractive. The base has the characteristic shape of Samsung's old BF monitors. But let's not be too hard on Samsung. This is far from being an ugly monitor - it's just that clearly not enough design effort has gone into the build, especially if you look at what Samsung has done with monitors like their 970P. The design may be a bit nondescript, but the ergonomics isn't. The control buttons are grouped together on the façade. The OSD is very practical. There is a tilt adjustment, but no height adjustment.

The panel's colour rendering was very good, but the default settings didn't produce accurate colours. You'll need to spend a little time tweaking them. We got a very good calibration curve with our own adjustments (Red=66, Green=39, Blue=40). The black level is excellent. And since the brightness is intense, the result is a very remarkable contrast. Samsung specifies 1000:1, and we measured 938:1. Kudos is in order. This monitor gets the benefit of the huge effort Samsung has made to improve the contrast of these displays. However, at the risk of seeming like a nitpicker, I will point out that the panel's brightness is excessive at the calibration point. That makes it ideal for video, but for office applications, you'll have to adjust the brightness down, and in so doing you will lose a little colour fidelity. Tested with the Gretag Eye-One Display 2, the 215TW had no big surprises in store. The performance we measured is in line with what we expected. However we did notice slight compression in the red channel as the light intensity increased.

The panel's uniformity was good but not exceptional. It was in the high average, with all values grouped within 20% of the total range. The upper right corner was less bright, but that wasn't visible to the eye, with either dark or light images. The panel proved to be fairly fast, and unlike its competitors, it was also fairly accurate. The Overdrive technology is under control. We noted only one instance of overshoot, at 200. Overall the latency was respectable, albeit a notch below the best in the category. Overdrive was well controlled, with only a slight overshoot of under 0.5 frames.

If you seek a monitor geared for office applications, I'm afraid this isn't it. Text was very sharp, but the default brightness is just too intense. For photography use, however, provided you've taken the time and effort to tweak it, this display delivers fine colour with exceptional contrast. So this monitor would be a good choice for amateur photo work. For pros, though, the brightness is too high to spend entire days in front of it. Gaming was also a very nice experience with the 215TW, and with its well controlled Overdrive, you won't pay the price of a lot of video artefacts for its good reactivity. Latency was perceptible at times, though, especially compared to other models - mostly TN panels - that are faster....And since this model offers good pixel interpolation, you'll be able to play in 1024x768 resolution without losing image quality.

But we were disappointed with the video performance - especially since this monitor had everything going for it on paper. While sparkling artefacts were very visible, colour masses were very noisy when we watched DVDs. The performance was a little better than that of TN panels for gamers, but still far from the standard set by some 19" panels, and a little short of 20" VA panels."


BEHARDWARE: "The 215TW is vertically adjustable and has a pivot mode. We appreciate these options, especially the vertical adjustment. Samsung also gives the possibility – like Apple – to create profiles with software. Without a colorimeter, this manufacturer also gives you the option to adjust the monitor from a series of patterns. We appreciate the initiative and it’s better than nothing, even if standard adjustments are as satisfactory for most users. We draw your attention to the fact that compared to MVA panels, PVAs have higher twinkling effects in videos. For games, however, the two technologies are equivalent."


BIT-TECH: "I am pleased to report that the SyncMaster 215TW delivered a strong showing in DisplayMate. The 256 intensity level colour ramp test was an area of weakness on the Dell 2407WFP, resulting in some banding issues. However, there were no apparent banding issues with the 215TW - the colour gradients were smooth and vibrant with no compression at either end of the scale. We looked at a number of high-resolution photographs on the screen to see whether there was any apparent colour compression going on. The colour reproduction was up there with the best of monitors we've seen - colours were vibrant and full, without being over-saturated. The blacks were very dark, while still maintaining good levels of detail and no apparent compression showing up. Shadows were pretty much the same, too - the details in shadows were as sharp as the details in lighter areas....Text looked very sharp in all of the tested scenarios when using the DVI port. Whether we were looking at black text on a white background, white text on a black background, or somewhere in between the two extremes, it didn't seem to make much difference at all - general use scenario we threw at the 215TW delivered superb results.

High-Definition content looked simply amazing on this screen - colours were rich and vibrant. The MagicBright2 movie preset looked good too, but it would require some tweaking depending on the content being played. We also looked at some particularly intense scenes from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. In particular, we looked at chapter 25, which contains lots of fast moving foliage and tree tops mixed with a bright sky, water and subtle skin and cloth tones. I've sat down and played numerous games on this display over the last few days and everything looked great. The quoted 8ms response time didn't show any signs of ghosting in fast paced games like NFS: Most Wanted. The display coped incredibly well with the blacks in F.E.A.R. and Quake 4, while the contrast between bright HDR lighting and dark shadows in Half-Life 2: Episode One looked as good as we've seen on any other widescreen LCD monitor. We also fired up The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion on the display. The landscapes looked simply fantastic and we were drawn right into the game with the combination of vibrant colour reproduction and the display's ability to cope incredibly well with Oblivion's FP16 HDR lighting techniques.

During my time with this monitor, I've grown to love it. Using the screen everyday is a pleasure and despite its size, it is incredibly flexible, thanks to Samsung's excellent array of adjustment and configuration options. Height adjustment, pivot and swivel are functions that are often overlooked by many monitor manufacturers, leaving end users with nothing but a tilt option. Controlling the MagicBright2 pre-sets is easy and intuitive...(compared with the NEC LCD20WGX2) The image quality is slightly better, and the connectivity options are in another league altogether. Probably the only downside to the 215TW is the lack of USB 2.0 connections and if you can live without those, there is no reason to look beyond the SyncMaster 215TW at the moment."


SHARKYPAL: "Well, I spend my life gaming (sad I know). I would definitely say 100++ hours a week (and usually more). I play pretty much everything. My games "du jour" are EQ2, LOMAC, GRAW (Online), PRMM (BF2 Realism mod) and Hitman : Blood Money. I have yet to experience any kind of "ghosting" or "lag" or any manifestation of "non responsive" behaviour...As it stands I am an avid gamer and a hardcore movie nut. I don't always watch movies on my 215tw, but I have done and they look A1."

BREEZYCOOL (Anandtech): "The contrast was great. Colours were vivid and clean. I never knew how sharp my D60 and 20D cameras were until I displayed the images on the LCD. It was astounding! Colour accuracy compared well with my non-pro CRT: All images edited on the 215tw were confirmed on the CRT for accuracy (for about 2 weeks now) and I have yet to make any tweaks after reviewing on the CRT. In fact, my CRT images were always a bit flat when compared to my printouts. I've gotten used to it - however, with the extra contrast of the 215tw, the images on the screen match the calibrated printouts in saturation and contrast. Finally... what I see is what I print. Sharpness: Since the 2025 uses the same resolution on a smaller area, the screen initially appears sharper. However, significantly less contrast nullified this affect. Text at the same setting was more readable on the 215. Pictures had much more apparent sharpness. Viewing Angles: The contrast fade you get when viewing off center seems much more significant on the 2025. As I like to move around a lot, this would make it more of a problem.

Backlight Bleed: Even at max settings on an all-black screen, the backlight bleed is minimal and can only be seen if all the lights are out at night. At my settings, I have to move my head around and really look for any sign of bleed in the corners in a dark room. Ghosting in tests: I did the Behardware.com test (photograph the moving car at shutter speed of 1/1000s) In this test, the VX2025 wins hands down. Images at the end of the refresh cycle on the 2025 showed little, if any, left-over's from the previous frame. Meanwhile the 215tw showed remnants of up to 2 or 3 previous frames. So the 215tw's 8ms is significantly slower than the 2025's 8ms. Ghosting in Games: I set up mirror mode and played COD2 and Oblivion side by side. If I paid close attention to the high contrast edges of the action, I did notice a difference in favour of the 2025 - but the 2025 still ghosts. The affect is most noticeable when rotating your POV. As all the elements on screen are in motion, the whole image becomes a tad blurry. This affected both the 2025 and 215tw - and I could tell little difference between the two monitors under these extreme conditions. Long story short, if you are a hard-core gamer you probably don't want the 215tw. For me, the difference in the two monitors was just not perceptible enough to sway me one way or another."


MR LATTE: "First thing to notice is that 21" in WS is a lovely size to work with and considering the price difference to 23-24" models its well placed in the market. I choose this model because of its additional input connections, being HDCP compliant and it has a higher resolution, portraits for general PC use which an HDTV wouldn't do. Its worth pointing out that I was after a dual purpose all round display rather than one that excelled in games. The reported 1000:1 contrast is very evident, things are really clear, testing has only been done with VGA cables so id imagine DVI to be a little sharper. Colours are of a very high standard and although calibration hasn't been done from experience i can state the only weakness in colour is possibly some over saturation (reds) of course calibrating would alter this to the users taste and reducing the contrast for an easier on the eye setting.

Gaming is very nice on the screen with very minimal ghosting, i reckon yes the NEC and others may have even less lag but the Samsung has many strengths / benefits for its slight drop in performance in this area, only the hardest hardcore gamers would not be pleased with it in gaming aspects. I tried the X360 in 480p mode and it worked fine, changing to 720p did improve things a lot but you still can see the drop of sharpness coming from the scaling, consider it like a mild transparent smearing. Overall its very usable, and once again the evidence of the colour brilliance on this monitor is clear, console games can look very cartoon-y with bold rich colouring. I don't use such small screens for viewing movies and although I tried several trailers/videos from the X360 these looked pretty good for a monitor and didn't show any major twinkling with 720p. Lower resolutions and higher compressed video formats scaled to full screen will perhaps show it more. Loss of contrast in any given area isn't a problem as the monitor shows an even spread across the whole panel, no screen dimming here folks. Viewing angles are also very good, both in portrait and landscape modes, something that's very noticeable on some TN panels is their lack of vertical viewing."
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Dell 3007WFP
30" Widescreen. 2560 x 1600 resolution, 14ms Response time (11ms G2G), 700:1 Contrast Ratio, 400 cd/m2 brightness, 178/178 Viewing Angles.
2x DVI connections, Integrated 4 port USB 2.0 Hub and 9 in 2 Card Reader. HDCP Enabled


3007wfp.jpg


Dell decided to go one better than their already very popular 2405FPW, and release a massive 30" WS monitor (well, 29.7" viewable). This has a huge resolution as well to back up the size, offering the same number of pixels as three 19" TFT's! This resolution offers the smallest pixel pitch of any of the screens as well, at 0.250. The size of this screen obviously makes it a potentially excellent choice for someone looking for not only a large PC screen, but a multimedia and movie screen rolled into one. Perhaps the biggest drawback of this size is that to run games and this kind of huge resolution needs a very powerful graphics card, or even two! You'll need a dual DVI output to support the native resolution of 2560 x 1600 and to even hope of having a half decent frame you'll need something like a 7800 GT SLI. This screen needs more than double the power needed to run a 1600 x 1200 resolution. However, image scaling is said to be very good on this screen, and so playing at lower resolutions can still keep a good level of image quality and sharpness.

The screen itself features a 30" S-IPS panel from LG.Philips, the LM300W01. This has been used previously in the Apple 30" Cinema Display as well, but curiously Dell list this as 11ms on grey to grey transitions. It looks like there has been some introduction of overdrive as also used in the 2405FPW (rated 16ms response time, but 12ms or even 8ms G2G in some specs). There are rumours that Dell may switch to using the 30" Samsung PVA panel which has recently been released, and will also be featured in Samsung's own 305T screen. However, at this time, it seems the Dell is using an S-IPS panel from LG.Philips.

There is very minimal OSD selection on this screen, with the only direct adjustment available being brightness. Instead, you have to rely on Dell's own Color Monitor software. Annoyingly, this supposedly can't be installed on a non-Dell PC. Dell have also done away with some of the added connectivity which made the 2405FPW so popular. The S Video and composite connections have gone now sadly, bur fortunately the USB and card reader remain. Performance wise, the image is sharp and clear, and gaming is actually very good. You need to be a couple of metres away really to enjoy gaming, but this really helps make the most of the screen and any afterglow is soon forgotten. Movie playback is again fine from a couple of metres away. Perhaps the main issue which seems to be effecting the 3007WFP is panel uniformity, and this is probably down to the size and configuration of the CCFL backlighting mostly.

Official Dell Spec


Comparison size pics
(Dell 2405FPW in front of, and then next to, the 3007WFP. Shows the size of this screen)


-------------------------------------------
Reviews:

BeHardware Review (March 2006)
PC Mag Review (January 2006)
Firing Squad Review (March 2006)
ExtremeTech Review (January 2006)
Ubergizmo Review (February 2006)
Prad.de Review (Feb 2006)


-------------------------------------------
Advanced Tests:

< Click Here >

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User Comments:

BEHARDWARE: "The monitor is big and imposing, and Dell has signed it and included –thank you- a vertically adjustable base. What a blessing! Only a few monitors are designed to offer such functions. Manufacturers often tend to think a heavy panel will eventually break the product. For now it holds on pretty well. The screen slides perfectly. It is a real pleasure to adjust.....it is hard to find a faster memory card player than this one. In short, this monitor’s memory card player will often replace your previous external dedicated memory card player (very effectively) or even the direct USB connection between cameras and computers (that have transfer rates a tenth of what we saw here).

There was a problem, however. Brightness is far from being homogenous on this panel. A specialist on big TV monitors confirmed that it was the one major issue for this type of product as the bigger the monitor, the more effect backlighting can have. It’s really difficult to have the same color quality all over the panel and brightness gaps are considerable, up to 40% between two corners. Brightness varies from 126 cd/m² on the top left corner to 176 cd/m² on the lowest right hand corner! We measured up to a 40% higher brightness and these variations have direct consequences on color quality. After these measurements we went back to the manufacturer a little worried....Perfectly aware of the consequences of such a result they (Dell) offered us to replace the monitor. But differences measured on the second one were even higher! We measured 138 cd/m² on the top left corner, 187 cd/m² in the middle and 207 cd/m² in the bottom right. This time there is a 50% performance gap! We will stick to the results of the first one…With our measurements, we would not be inclined to recommend this monitor to graphic designers for whom color quality is important. Calibrating this monitor isn’t enough, because only one area is calibrated. Moving one picture from one area to another will change colors and it’s disturbing.

Not every graphic card is equipped to display a resolution of 2560x1600. First of all, to display as many pixels via a standard DVI port, you have to use a card equipped with a Dual link type input. Indeed in standard mode, DVI is restricted to 1920 x 1200 and you have to couple two TDMS 165 MHz signals to generate the 2560 x 1600. This is the case of the 7800 GT, 7800 GTX, X1600, X1800, and X1900. If the game does lag, there is the future Quad SLI solution… or reducing the resolution which is a more reasonable option. It is possible to play at half the resolution or 1280 x 800. Of course, everything is less accurate but perfectly sharp and the most power hungry games reach higher framerate....Play in full resolution (and) you will be amazed. We guarantee total immersion in the game. Of course to play, step back at least 1.5 to 2 meters. Your field of vision will cover the whole monitor and you will get the second non-negligible advantage of less noticeable afterglow.

We clearly see that afterglow is (more apparent) to TN, IPS and fast PVA's under 6ms. This is what we can see in games when we are close to the monitor. As soon as we step back a little, it’s negligible. The 3007WFP will also be very convenient for many gamers. Sport, plane strategy games and MMORPG (like WoW) are really impressive. For other FPS it’s a little more delicate. On the one hand there is the afterglow effect and on the other 3D resources are required.

Like all IPS monitors, this one benefits from very wide viewing angles. It’s wider than TN and VA's. Like all IPS, this monitors has twinkling effects in color scales. Just like with games, you only have to step back a little when you watch a movie. From a distance of 2 meters you won´t be disturbed by afterglow or the movement of pixels. So is it oversized? The answer is no. It’s like when the 17" LCD arrived on the market and we found them enormous compared to the 15" and 14". It’s the same for the 19" then the 20" and the 24". Once again, we get used to this diagonal really quickly and we started to find other monitors a little too small."


PCMAG: "In normal desktop use, you'll actually want to crank the 3007WFP's brightness down to minimum. Staring at a large, overbright display for a full day is a recipe for eyestrain. The display's lowest brightness settings are in line with ergonomic recommendations, but the display still maintains a contrast ratio close to the rated 700:1. n terms of performance, image quality is quite good on this display, with both video and desktop graphics images appearing crisp and clean. In our lab tests, we discovered some issues with backlight uniformity. In actual desktop PC use, this isn't noticeable, but you can see some hot spots in video content that has lots of dark material.


EXTREMETECH: "One area where the Dell display performed impressively was in color-temperature tracking. To summarize our lab results, the Dell 3007WFP offers excellent contrast ratio and luminance numbers, good color-temperature tracking, and a typical CIE color response curve. Uniformity is a bit of a concern, though in daily desktop use, it's not an issue. We used the 3007WFP for normal office tasks, including writing, web browsing and some Photoshop work. Having the ability to open lots of windows and being able to see most of them was a real productivity enhancer. On the other hand, we did occasionally suffer from the "tennis game spectator" effect—you have to move your head sometimes to take in the entirety of the display. Video playback looked pretty good, although some digital video showed slight scaling artefacts. We saw no evidence of streaking or ghosting during game play or watching DVD movies. The PC Magazine synthetic test, which moves a colored box around the screen at high speed, only showed tearing near corners, but the overall artefacts were minimal.


Another source: "The panel has an inch-thick bezel that uses a different type of plastic to other Dell TFT's. The top and bottom are accented with silver surrounds, and the 3007 looks more like a stylish TV than an ultra-high resolution monitor. Keeping a somewhat minimalist look, the 3007WFP has three buttons on the right-hand side. They're built into the bezel itself, keeping the smooth lines of the chassis intact. The +/- buttons control the panel's brightness, although a lack of an on-screen display is conspicuous by its absence. Incidentally, the buttons work off capacitance, so you only need to just touch the button(s) for them to become active. All other monitor-related functions must be run through your graphics card's control panel. The monitor has a reasonable degree of vertical adjustment. You simply push down on the top and the panel's height-adjustable stand lowers by up to 90mm, to nearly touch its base.

There's no high-definition media around that can correctly utilise the display's 2560x1600 resolution: even 1080p is limited to 1920x1080 pixels. The Dell 3007WFP has no inbuilt video-scaler ASIC, perhaps providing the reason why analogue inputs have been eschewed. Rather, scaling is handled by the graphics card in your PC, so, in the main, the quality of DVD playback (480p for PAL) will depend upon just how proficient your dual-link DVI card is. The initial problem with gaming at native WQXGA resolution is finding titles that support it. Most games' resolution options are limited to 1600x1200 or 1920x1200. However, should you find a game that can be run at 2560x1600, such as Far Cry, the result is nothing short of stunning."


ELRIC: "Absolutely bloody fantastic for playing games on tbh. I was a bit concerned when buying it that I would be moving around the screen due to the size. But after a day or two you get used to it. simply dwarfs my 2405."

D3LIRIOUS: "In terms of image quality I haven't noticed any problems as yet, other than the odd small graphical glitch in tiger woods 2006 where a small object may suddenly get drawn in the wrong place for a fraction of a second or the card may even skip a a frame. (the screen once went completely white for a very small fraction of a second - could barely notice it but it happened all the same.
I'm getting the feeling that the circuitry on these 7800 cards, or possibly other makes and models, were not really designed to run games at this rez and so there are very slight issues related to pushing so many pixels - even though in most situations the actual power is there - if that makes any sense."


PRAD.DE: "Using a Colorimeter, we went about cross-checking this monitor's brightness values. The minimum brightness we determined was 110 cd/sqm and the maximum was 391 cd/sqm. Hence, the display can't quite reach the maximum brightness value promised by the manufacturer. Generally speaking, the range for brightness adjustability is fairly large, whereas the possibility for reducing it down to overly dark levels is not provided. Given a normally lit environment, we deem it best to work with brightness levels around 140 cd/sqm. With the Dell 3007WFP, this corresponds to a brightness setting of about level 5 or 6.

The reproducible colour space of this display is quite large and the subjective image quality it can deliver looks very good. Quite contrary to colour fidelity, which did not prove to be one of the Dell 3007WFP's strengths. Thus, we deem this display rather unsuited for more demanding domains such as graphics work, picture editing or design. The responsiveness of the Dell 3007WFP is impressive. Even without Overdrive, this monitor can cope with fast displays. There is no perceivable amount of ghosting in fast paced first person shooters. We rate the Dell 3007WFP's interpolated image quality as very good, part of which can be thanked to the monitor's small pixel size of 0.250 mm. Interpolated images show only marginal loss in detail and focus.

Thanks to the S-IPS panel, very subtle grey and colour gradients are depicted clearly. The Dell 3007WFP doesn't have the slightest problem with dark movie scenes, fog, clouds or headlight glare effects. Due to the high resolution, the Dell 3007WFP will immediately bring to light any qualitative flaws that video or DVD material can have – like bad compression for instance. This monitor is built to display movie material of high quality, - preferably of HD quality. Given adequate movie material, the Dell 3007WFP will live up to its true potential and consequently reward the viewer with outstanding image quality."
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Originally posted by Crispy_Pigeon
Wow, that's a good and comprehensive FAQ.

I got quoted! :D

BUMP
hehe, credit where credit is due i say!!! glad u liked it.......took a while! :D but hopefulyl willanswer some questions that pop up every day!

and yes, Snow-Munki, i have too much free time, thought i'd make myslef useful!
 
Associate
Joined
30 Apr 2003
Posts
1,794
Location
The dark side of the moon
nice work, you obviously put a hell of a lot of effort into it. have some stars for effort :)

am thinking about getting a tft myself, and this saves my trawling through the hundreds of other threads.
 
Soldato
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Posts
20,264
Location
UK
Originally posted by growse
/me remembers this from before.

Good rebumpage with decent updates :)

its surprising how much fo the thread from before was not usable tho..........had the Sammy 181T and stuff too but was a bit dated now........sooo much more stuff now too.
 
Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
10,063
Location
At home
Originally posted by NicktheNorse
but if both the Hyundai and Acer use the same panel, why is the contrast ratio spec different?

hmm can't you have same panel but slightly different spec ?

the whole hercules TFT with 2 sorts of DVI, one with a better contrast ratio....
 
Associate
Joined
9 Jul 2003
Posts
2,495
Well done! What an awesome post - will be very helpful for all those who are considering going down the highly reccomended TFT route!

Sticky this asap!:)
 
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