*** Big Fat Weight Loss Thread ***

Man of Honour
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That aligns more with my experience. For example, I put my details into MyFitnessPal which calculated a daily intake of 1500kcal to lose weight at the desired rate. This was based on my assessment of my activity level as ‘not very active’. This has previously worked (although not as fast as predicted) when my daily exercise wasn’t more than a leisurely walk.

I’ve now upped my regular activity level. Having done a short stint of cardio which the machine tells me was worth 300 calories, should I now eat 300 more to break even and still lose at the same rate?

I used to have a Fitbit which would tell me I had done 600-800 calories of exercise daily when I hadn’t exerted myself more than a few trips up the stairs, hence my scepticism and confusion!
 
Soldato
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I’ve now upped my regular activity level. Having done a short stint of cardio which the machine tells me was worth 300 calories, should I now eat 300 more to break even and still lose at the same rate?
I would highly doubt a short stint of cardio is even going to burn 300 cals, and likely this is over exaggerated as well.

This is entirely goal dependant, are you looking to lose weight still or maintain?? If you are looking to maintain and want to eat back what you think you've burned on top of what you consider is your activity level based on your TDEE calculations then I would do so VERY cautiously, like only eating back 50% max.

In terms of your fitbit it should be telling you your calories burned over the day, this isnt just from exercise its from all activity. Which is why even first thing in the morning you should be at a few hundred cals burned.
 
Man of Honour
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I have a question. The ‘calories burned’ measurement on various bits of fitness equipment, eg bike, treadmill, elliptical - is it accurate?

Following on from that, if one had calculated that 1800 calories were to be consumed in a day, and they did 200 calories of exercise as measured on the aforementioned equipment, would they then be able to consume 200 kcal extra to break even?

A friend was explaining this to me and I thought surely it can’t be that simple?

Would the same measurement by a fitness tracker (e.g. Apple Watch, Fitbit) be more accurate and would the same principle apply?
Based on my experience with smart watches they can vary massively based in the same exercise, so I generally assume they aren't accurate.

I generally walk 6km every morning, over the same route and at the same pace, within a minute or so anyway. Calories burned, according to my watch, can vary by 250 calories or more.

Not that I eat back calories burned exercising anyway.
 
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