Do people realise how bad the Ambulance service is right now?

Caporegime
Joined
20 May 2007
Posts
36,659
Location
Surrey
The impractical aspirations that the poor have been given, especially the poor younger generations is also blameworthy. It has left at least two generations disgruntled with their lots

There is an element of truth to this, yes.

"You can do anything/be anything if you put your mind to it" is one of the the biggest and most dangerous lies ever told.
 
Soldato
Joined
28 Nov 2003
Posts
7,701
Location
Shropshire
A damning verdict on a local, large hospital trust who were already the subject of horrendous lack of care charges.

Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust admits failures after two patients die​


A hospital trust has been fined more than £1.3m after admitting failures in care that contributed to the deaths of two patients.
One of the charges related to the death of patient Mohammed Ismael Zaman in 2019 at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital.
The 31-year-old died of severe blood loss while undergoing dialysis, Telford Magistrates' Court heard.
Max Dingle, in his 80s, died after his head became trapped between a mattress and bed rail during hospital treatment.
Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH) admitted three counts of failing to provide treatment and care in a safe way, resulting in harm or loss, between October 2019 and May 2020.
Charges were brought against the trust by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) under the Health and Social Care Act 2008.

Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust has also faced intense criticism over maternity failings
Representing the CQC, Ryan Donoghue said the failures in Mr Zaman's care "were the legal cause of his death, for which the trust is responsible".
He said Mr Dingle, who had been admitted with chronic lung disease, died from a cardiac arrest after he was freed.
"The basis [of the guilty plea] is that the failures exposed him to a significant risk of avoidable harm," Mr Donoghue said.
As well as the two deaths, the CQC accused the trust of exposing other patients to significant risk of avoidable harm.

'Devil and deep blue sea'​

In court, SaTH accepted it would take considerable time to rebuild trust with the local community after entering guilty pleas.
The trust is currently £60m in debt and during the hearing the judge acknowledged every pound he fined the trust would be "a pound that doesn't go on patient care".
"It's a devil and deep blue sea exercise," the judge said. "In the end, fines make patients suffer."
The trust was recently subject of a damning review into its maternity services.
The Ockenden review, published in March, found "repeated errors in care" at the trust contributed to the deaths of 201 babies between 2000-2019.

These cases were neither funding nor staffing issues, but pure unadulterated negligence and incompetence in my opinion.
 
Associate
Joined
23 May 2004
Posts
2,097
The impractical aspirations that the poor have been given, especially the poor younger generations is also blameworthy. It has left at least two generations disgruntled with their lots
Social media and the internet too. Everyone knows just by looking at their phone how much they are getting screwed on a daily basis.
 
Soldato
Joined
10 May 2012
Posts
8,358
Location
Leeds
There is an element of truth to this, yes.

"You can do anything/be anything if you put your mind to it" is one of the the biggest and most dangerous lies ever told.

I mean, it isn't, it's actually an incredibly good thing to say to people since it encourages them to aim for goals they might otherwise think are out of their reach. Surely they're going to be in a better position simply by having strong aspirations than if they were told not to bother trying? How is it dangerous?
 
Soldato
Joined
16 Aug 2009
Posts
6,669
Yes we're aware. The NHS is usually pushed to the limit over winter only to level out over the summer months. Except the last couple of years the NHS has become the Covid Treatment Service and coupled with the total unwillingness to do anything to limit infections and hence hospitalisations we're where we are now. We also have one of the lowest number of spare capacity in beds in europe to boot. So add it all up and we're where we are now.
 
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