Help with 5800x Ryzen Master settings

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Hello all, I just started my career in game programming and we have to use pretty heavy stuff like the Unreal Engine where we have to compile the source quite a lot. This took a very long time (sometimes upto 5/6 hours) with my Ryzen 7 2700x CPU and so I've just upgraded my PC with a Ryzen 7 5800x CPU.

I'm using a stock Wraith Prism cooler for now as I'll need to save up some money for a better cooler and I've noticed immediately the temps are higher than my old CPU. For instance during idle, the temps range from 35 to 40 degree Celsius and when I open the file explorer it goes to around 50-56 degree Celsius. I don't think the temp should jump to 50 by just opening the explorer.

I also am seeing a feature called the "Curve Optimizer" and "Eco Mode" in Ryzen Master which I have no idea what it does. Could anyone recommend me good Ryzen Master settings for my CPU please? I'd prefer using the Precision Boost Overdrive as well.

My specs are: CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800x
Motherboard: Gigabyte X470 Aorus Ultra Gaming ATX AM4 Motherboard
RAM: 32 GB
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply

Thank you
 
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Rab

Rab

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well known fact the the 5800 run real hot, decent cooler will lower it. but said it a hot chip :p
 
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I'm using a stock Wraith Prism cooler for now as I'll need to save up some money for a better cooler and I've noticed immediately the temps are higher than my old CPU. For instance during idle, the temps range from 35 to 40 degree Celsius and when I open the file explorer it goes to around 50-56 degree Celsius. I don't think the temp should jump to 50 by just opening the explorer.

It is normal behaviour with Zen 3, particularly the 5800X.

About eco mode:


It lowers clocks and power consumption, for a small reduction in performance and temperature.
 
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https://overclockers.co.uk/forums/threads/5800x-pbo-curve-optimiser-help-please.18949725/

The exact things you are asking I was also looking into in this thread here. A short summary of what I found:

5800X is the hottest CPU from the Zen 3 series as all its cores are on one chiplet so only in 1/3 of the die making the heat hard to dissipate.

5800X has less cache than the 5900X and 5950X which as we have seen with the 5800X3D makes a big difference. It compensates by running at higher clock speeds which generates more heat by needing more voltage.

Curve Optimiser lets you set a voltage offset for each core to use less voltage at a given speed. This uses less power so makes less heat at a given speed allowing higher clocks. But if you go too far it makes your system unstable. The goal is to find how low you can go whilst remaining stable in testing and real world use.

The sweet spot for keeping your 5800X cool enough to boost well is around a PPT of 110W, a TDC of 75A and an EDC of 100A. Anything higher lets it draw more power but makes more heat for diminishing returns and even lower performance depending upon your cooling.

Install and run Ryzen master. Don't change anything but note which cores are rated as preferred cores I think in Ryzen master they are 1-8 whereas in the BIOS and HWiNFO64 they are 0-7 so adjust by -1 accordingly.

I would suggest setting the PPT, TDC and EDC values in the BIOS and setting a 50mHz PBO offset for a small boost to clocks then setting a core offset of -20 on each core in the BIOS under Curve Optimiser, -15 on the preferred 2 cores (0 if Ryzen Master said 1, 7 if Ryzen master said 8...). Then run CoreCycler to test the cores and leave it overnight to see if any generate errors (setup guide txt comes with the download). Any that made an error (pink text in the log) should be reduced to -15, any others can go up to -25. Retest over several nights. Again any that don't fail could go to -30 and any that fail go down by -5 to -10 or eventually -5. Also run games and Windows general usage between adjustments to search for instability.

This should find you the best performance per power
 
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And make sure to enable XMP for your RAM in the BIOS too. I tried tuning mine with the Memory calculator for 1usmus but just found it gave a lot of instability for 1% performance gains at best.
 
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Also having re-read your initial post, it would seem like stability would be your main concern compiling code for programming. The power settings (PPT, TDC and EDC) I suggested will be fine as they just limit the thermal and power targets. XMP likewise is very safe. The Curve optimiser settings though require a lot of testing and might not be worth it for you. Maybe leave the 2 best cores at 0 offset and set the others to -10 and then run stability tests and general usage for a few weeks before going any further.

Regarding temperatures, the normal operating temperature in Windows is easily 40-50c and up to 80 or 85c under heavy loads. The tuning I was suggesting will shave off maybe 10 to 15c under heavy loads vs PBO auto overclocking but not much versus stock settings. A better cooler is always nice but not absolutely necessary since your temperatures are basically quite normal.
Make sure to choose Balanced mode under Windows power options since this is optimised for Ryzen and will also lower the temperature when idle
 
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The 5800X is a hot cpu, as the others have said.

Undervolting will help.

You will need to get a better cooler but don’t expect temps to be in the 50 degree range under load, even with an AIO.

Feasibility, I could have suggested a 5900X for you instead but it sounds like money is tight and that’s with hindsight.
 
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You are actually compiling with a -j 17? (17 parallel compiles). If not, start there. If you can't do a parallel build due to dev restrictions and/or testing restrictions, you will absolutely need to set the 5800X up right or it will not perform to it's best.

For single thread compiling, you want your PBO set up working and verified as working. Then you want to take your boost clock offset up to 5Ghz or however high it remains stable. This will allow you to unlock the real single threaded power of the 5800X. It will dedicate it's 2 best cores to the single thread, alternating between the two (they share cache) so neither gets hot. Both go to max boost and stay there. (If you can cool them).

For multi-thread compiling, you also want PBO setup properly, but here the power limits, PPT, TDC, EDC and the curve optimizer come into play. They all relate to managing the power and heat. Out of the box I found I could go straight to -30 on all cores in the curve. Only slightly instability, so I went to -25 and it's fine. Max boost clock is 5Ghz (Stock+150Mhz).

I do have to point out that I am using a kraken x73 360mm radiator to cool mine and it's not, really able to keep up with it fully overclocked and fully loaded. I am converting to a custom loop to see if I can actually get it to run flat out, all cores at 4.8Ghz+ without thermal throttling.

On compiling. Usually there is room for parallelism. The normal approach is to use CPU Threads +1 or 2. The 1 or 2 is because you will always have at least one compile process waiting on disk/io.

So with 16 threads, you can aim for 18 parallel. Two things however. First multi-threading compiles tends not to increase performance, so I normal settle at Cores+1. So for the 5800X I'd go for 9. The other thing is this parallelism relies on the build process dependency tree to facilitate the compilation of components in parallel. Sometimes this isn't always possible. Some Linux applications simply don't compile with -j, the linux Kernel compiles with -j 50!

One final caution. The 5800X is very new. Some motherboard BIOS tweaks seem to have been rushed. The crosshair hero has 2 different sections for PBO settings. They are NOT the same. One is the Asus tweaker settings which do Asus specific auto-overlocking, the other one, buried in Advanced->AMD Overclocking are the genuine AMD settings. Making settings under both leads to a confusing mess.
 
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It gets a lot of flack for heat, due to having a a single core complex containing 8 cores. A lot of people might suggest they would have been better moving to 2xCore complexes with 4 cores each.

However, having all 8 cores on the one complex means they ALL share the L2 cache. Which importantly means the 1st and 2nd best cores are gauranteed to share cache and can be paired up to run single threads easier and thus faster. The 5800X3D slaps an L3 cache directly on top of them too for even more shared core performance boots.

The downside is focused heat, which is harder to remove.
 
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On PBO/Curve optimizer. It's not only dependant on the chip, it's individual silicon quality, but it is also massively dependant on your motherboard, in particular the VRMs. Not just in AMP capacity, but in stability and resilience to power spikes. PBO can ramp the voltage up and down 100 times a second. If it makes a big jump from like 800mV to 1.4V cheaper/lower rated VRMs can hiccup and supply a slightly less stable voltage during the transition. When you try and push the clocks it crashes. I have seen 140A draw on mine, that's a lot. The Crosshair VIII us a "baller board", it has 200A of current, but it's also a really expensive board designed to go all the way to liquid nitrogen cooling. I'm only tickling it.

So if you have a cheap or not "overclock focused" mobo, your mileage may vary with how much performance you can unlock from it.
 
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The Strix is only, what, 1 or 2 steps down from the crosshair. I would have thought it would have good VRMs and a bit of room for overclocking. Certainly enough for a stock+pbo+xmp setup boosting to the 4.85GHz sticker figure.

Obviously you have the CPU power headers all populated and they are running ideally on different power rails to the GPU?
 
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