Road Cycling

fez

fez

Soldato
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I've got a set of GP5000s TR tyres I am about to return to winstanleys after there was a bit of a mix up with timings on new tyres.

These seem to be out of stock in quite a few places or more expensive. If anyone here wants them at cost I will happily cover the postage to you.

£130 for the pair or £65 each.

If I don't have any takers by Wednesday I'll just return them but this might be useful for someone.
 
Soldato
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Urgh. The preload cap on my cranks is done up incredibly tight. I've tried two plastic tools and lost skin on my hands to no avail. No idea why the guy that fitted my BB has done this. Trying to remove as the BB is creaking... probably because it is too tight.
 

fez

fez

Soldato
Joined
22 Aug 2008
Posts
20,173
Location
Tunbridge Wells
Urgh. The preload cap on my cranks is done up incredibly tight. I've tried two plastic tools and lost skin on my hands to no avail. No idea why the guy that fitted my BB has done this. Trying to remove as the BB is creaking... probably because it is too tight.

Shimano? If so, did you undo the bolts on the crank arm before you tried to take out the preload cap?
 
Soldato
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8,219
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Hereford
Silly question alert...

Want to get my partner up and running on the turbo trainer in a few weeks but in order to make it easier for her I wanted to replace her rear thru-axle with one with a lever on it. Her current one means using an Allen key and I'd rather make it less fiddly when it comes to switching our bikes over.

MbrMlzB.jpg


That's the axle in her bike. I don't know if you're supposed to measure the entire thing or just the barrel part. My guess would be that it's 170mm

Would this be a suitable replacement?
qwbQseG.png


Only thing I can't seem to find anywhere is the pitch of the thread.

Edit: and of course after asking I think I've sussed it. Think it's the size smaller with a different pitch
Make sure you get the thread pitch correct! That's more important than the axle length - excess axle length will just screw through the frame (might knock some paint off if it's painted into the hole).


Thru Axles can be a nightmare, good site here which kinda explains it but from the MTB side (if you're really that interested in understanding it) - https://bermstyle.com/how-to-determine-thread-pitch-on-rear-thru-axle/

The Robert Axle Project page has quite a good lookup tool for getting thru axles for different frames to attach trailers etc. Although that's not what you're doing, you can easily use it to determine the axle length and pitch type for the frame (if it's listed). They're expensive but supreme quality and amazing to deal with, could not recommend higher!

My specialized Diverge using 'SCS' standard is basically a 'mid length' thru axle as the spacing is between 135 and 142mm with 'fine pitch' threading (the same as Syntace, or X12). So getting a 142 thru axle with the right pitch worked (but I knew it would as I've 'stretched' it to use a 142mm wheelset). I went through quite a lot of research to get there...

Damn. This turned out to be a stripped thread in the chainring - not the bolt. I had to use aftermarket Raceface bolts after an original Shimano stripped (the head came off). At the time bolts were literally unavailable. Local shops were waiting months too. The Raceface bolts are steel... the chainring is alloy. Seems odd for the bolt to come loose just after a BB change where in theory they weren't touched but whatever.

I wonder if there's anyway to salvage the chainring?

Drilling it out, or using 'bolt extractor' to remove should get the chainring off? Re-tapping it I guess. Is it a Shimano 4-arm with the crankset side that's stripped? Would be unusual for the chainring itself to be threaded due to the quite thin nature of them... If drilling and retapping doesnt work then drilling it out bigger and retapping to a larger bolt size you have one of that doesn't look too dissimilar to the other crank bolts. So although that's a bit of a bodge, at least it won't look that obvious...

Yeah, I'm sure I just need to do some work I don't want to do to get better at hills. Honestly I think there is just a base level of hill climbing fitness I need and then I won't feel like dying on the long steep ones. As long as I can spin up them its fine.

I guess part of it is just knowing your route and pacing yourself.

This. Pacing is key, especially on stuff you don't know. A big part of that is technique and being 'geared' for them. I'm riding a compact now with 32t for eaxactly that reason. I know I realiastically do not have a reason to be 'over geared' (although considering going 34t), so I know when riding high tempo at 80-90rpm and 230-270W I should be able to sustain it, even if I need to stand for a steep part, providing I don't go much above 300-350W for too long, I should be able to sit back down and continue that hard tempo.

If I'm kicking and ramping into a climb at 500-600W it's because I know it, or can see the top, so I can sustain it for the 30-60s required. Or when seeing a perfect climb stretching away infront of you, holding that 'sweet spot' you can sometimes find and just powering up it with numbers in excess of what you'd normally sustain. That is a great feeling (especially when clubmates are stood grinding and you just breeze past)!

I really hate hills. I love the feeling at the top of it as it's a nice feeling of accomplishment but I hate the going up part

I wouldn't say I like hills when riding them, particularly when going hard at the bottom/mid ramp without realising how long the top is... You can really gets to test your mettle/technique/willpower that way. :cry:

But saying I don't like hills is false, I absolutely LOVE them for that accomplishment. Quite a lot of my 'free riding' is ticking them off. Usually not even targetting a time or power, just riding them as hard as I can at that given point to then check the numbers and times etc afterwards. I'm not directly competing with others/myself, but I also am... If that makes sense! If I'm in good form, feeling good and climb a climb well - it's good to see that rewarded in the numbers and to set a good PR.

I need to do Ventoux next. I still think the Radio Tower is the hardest climb in the game

Ventoux is definitely hard, but mostly due to the duration of it. The Alpe is hard as it's so easy to split up and measure different efforts on to try and beat your times/pacings. Radio tower is horrible due to it's location.

They can all be made very horrible by racing them trust me! Also, well worth doing to really see what you're made of...! ;)

Structured training in most sports is fantastically effective, the only question for me is how much I value performance over enjoyment. I am/was a very keen climber and COVID lockdown kind of reset my perspective on my hobbies and what I want from them. Previously I was very committed to training 3 times a week and doing some training but I realised that I didn't enjoy that as much as climbing at a bit of a lower level and doing it less frequently but with more freedom.

Rock climbing? @Shamrock used to do a bunch of that. Good excuse to tag him as it's been a while since he was in here - hope you're good mate!

I've got a friend who's nuts about climbing, her shoulders and biceps against mine now are hilarious! :D

Urgh. The preload cap on my cranks is done up incredibly tight. I've tried two plastic tools and lost skin on my hands to no avail. No idea why the guy that fitted my BB has done this. Trying to remove as the BB is creaking... probably because it is too tight.

Argh nightmare! I got fed up with stripping the crappy plastic ones trying to get them to 8nM or whatever the recommended is. I got a birzman metal one, might have been from PX? One of these for about £5-6 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Birzman-Crank-Arm-Installation-Tool/dp/B015NXEDIS

Although no way to fit an allen to it, I do it up '2-3 grunts' and then do the crappy Shimano plastic one with an allen to be sure. It must be pretty close as they barely tighten before cam'ing out (is that the right term?).

Although looks like Birzman do one now you can fit an allen to, that would be my recommended (need to get one myself to just bin all the plastic shimano ones and 'get it right'): http://www.birzman.com/products_2.php?uID=2&cID=25&Key=283
 
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Soldato
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Odd one, had to replace my P2M battery as low, easiest to do it with the bike upside down on carpet and a long screwdriver as the screws are on the inside of the crankset by the BB. Turned bike over and got some hidden water out of the frame! Only it’s not ridden in the rain and a while since I washed it! Wonder how long it’s been in there and how it was trapped!

My BB also has what I think is one bad ball, I’ve had the crankset out and felt it, one side fine the other has a notchy point. Occasionally get some noise if uphill pedalling maybe 300w+ both in or out of the saddle (so ruling out seat post).

This set looks good. But who decided pressing on the frame to pull the BB was better than hammering the bearing from the inside… neither seem ideal to me… I have the park tool hammering set already as I used the other bits in a home made press.

I’m looking at the below and thinking you could DIY with a big socket bought off the shelf in the right diameter, some threaded rod and some washers which you could cut a piece off either side so they weren’t round. Pass those into the frame, slide washers onto the threaded rod and put a nut on the backside, put then socket on frame pass rod through hole in socket add another nut and wind it out?

 
Soldato
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5,327
Shimano? If so, did you undo the bolts on the crank arm before you tried to take out the preload cap?
Yeah. I removed it in the end. Discovered I had another hollowtech crank fixing bolt tool in an old crappy Planet X toolset. It was also not enough but it did sport flat edges compared to the Shimano tool. I wrapped the flat edges in elastic bands then used an adjustable spanner to undo it.

The cranks were definitely too tight. A little perplexed that it required a lot of force to remove the cranks and a lot to fit them again at the final 5mm or so. Either way, got it fitted again. Still creaking! Realised I can make the bike creak by applying mild pressure to the seatstay while stationary. Removed the QR and refitted and I can't replicate the creak any more. I'll know for sure when I ride up a hill but hopefully all sorted. I guess it's a silver lining that I discovered the cranks were fitted super tight... probably wouldn't have prolonged the new BB's life left like that.
Argh nightmare! I got fed up with stripping the crappy plastic ones trying to get them to 8nM or whatever the recommended is. I got a birzman metal one, might have been from PX? One of these for about £5-6 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Birzman-Crank-Arm-Installation-Tool/dp/B015NXEDIS

Although no way to fit an allen to it, I do it up '2-3 grunts' and then do the crappy Shimano plastic one with an allen to be sure. It must be pretty close as they barely tighten before cam'ing out (is that the right term?).

Although looks like Birzman do one now you can fit an allen to, that would be my recommended (need to get one myself to just bin all the plastic shimano ones and 'get it right'): http://www.birzman.com/products_2.php?uID=2&cID=25&Key=283
Interesting. Didn't realise some metal options exist. I also discovered this https://www.amazon.co.uk/Park-Tool-BBT-10-2-Adjusting-Cap/dp/B08J3MQK78 Looks useful as it would offer some leverage too.

Drilling it out, or using 'bolt extractor' to remove should get the chainring off? Re-tapping it I guess. Is it a Shimano 4-arm with the crankset side that's stripped? Would be unusual for the chainring itself to be threaded due to the quite thin nature of them... If drilling and retapping doesnt work then drilling it out bigger and retapping to a larger bolt size you have one of that doesn't look too dissimilar to the other crank bolts. So although that's a bit of a bodge, at least it won't look that obvious...
Fair points. It's Shimano 4 arm with a large chainring female thread stripped. The chainring is off, it's just most of the thread is stripped on it so it won't hold a bolt. I'm fairly sure it's threaded due to steel bolt vs alloy chainring and potentially slightly damaged thread already (the previous bolt before steel bolts and covid supply problems was official shimano alloy and the head twisted off).
 
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Soldato
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25 Oct 2006
Posts
5,327
Odd one, had to replace my P2M battery as low, easiest to do it with the bike upside down on carpet and a long screwdriver as the screws are on the inside of the crankset by the BB. Turned bike over and got some hidden water out of the frame! Only it’s not ridden in the rain and a while since I washed it! Wonder how long it’s been in there and how it was trapped!
My bike hordes water too. It gets in to the downtube somehow. Occasionally I'll hear it sloshing when I move it. There's a drainhole on the chainstay but relatively sure there's no easy path for a lot of water to get there.. the BB is lower and I imagine the BB+crank blocks the path for water.

As for replacing BB... I tried it once myself (due to covid bike shop backlogs) with a PRO tools BB remover (essentially a rod with a plate you secure in with a nut to fit behind the bearing on each side). I had to hit ridiculously hard with a metal hammer to remove the BB. I was pretty afraid of missing and writing off the frame.. this is why I resolved to paying someone else to change it this time. Not sure if I regret that yet considering how tight he fitted the cranks :D
 
Soldato
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This set looks good. But who decided pressing on the frame to pull the BB was better than hammering the bearing from the inside… neither seem ideal to me… I have the park tool hammering set already as I used the other bits in a home made press.

I’m looking at the below and thinking you could DIY with a big socket bought off the shelf in the right diameter, some threaded rod and some washers which you could cut a piece off either side so they weren’t round. Pass those into the frame, slide washers onto the threaded rod and put a nut on the backside, put then socket on frame pass rod through hole in socket add another nut and wind it out?


What BB size/type is it?

Wow that is crazy money for what you've found, as you say the tricky bit is the right size fitting for the socket over the BB and the washer inside to push it. The rest of it is fairly basic and easy stuff - threaded rod and some nuts! Hambini has a range of fittings for various BB sizes to aid in removal, although his actual 'tool' is always sold out, it's just threaded rod with nuts and washers. I think if you messaged him with the sizings you need he'd have something, or tool something for you if you had your own rod and nuts etc.

I ended up googling around and buying a Park Tool headset removal tool which was exactly the right size for my previous (Praxis Works M30). So I just hammered it out with the tool against the reverse of the internal bearing mounts. The Wheelsmfg BB30-OUT1 I have now, due to the threaded cup design I can easily remove by hand once it's unscrewed. I have a notchy NDS bearing and actually picked up replacement Enduro ones from Sigma for it for a fiver. Crazy cheap for how much they are normally, I actually bought 4 so I'm set for probably 5-10 years now! I also picked up Enduro wheel/freehub bearings while I was at it - all of them seemed to be £5 which is good money for Enduro quality. Normally use NTN for a few quid more! :D

Interesting. Didn't realise some metal options exist. I also discovered this https://www.amazon.co.uk/Park-Tool-BBT-10-2-Adjusting-Cap/dp/B08J3MQK78 Looks useful as it would offer some leverage too.

That Park one is a perfect tool, good ears for unscrewing and then a hex in the middle for correct torque when refitting. Thanks for sharing, ordered! :cool:

My bike hordes water too. It gets in to the downtube somehow. Occasionally I'll hear it sloshing when I move it. There's a drainhole on the chainstay but relatively sure there's no easy path for a lot of water to get there.. the BB is lower and I imagine the BB+crank blocks the path for water.

Don't you have a bottom 'hole' for any cable routing or a cable guide below the BB? Worth checking it's not got a hole there which is blocked.

I know I only have 2 brands of bike (4 frames of but very 'mainstream'/off the shelf) but they've all had one or the other which has a hole in it/next to it that drains the frame. On my Diverge & Contend (internal cables) it's a screwable cover which has a hole in it for draining. On the Defy and Avail it's a hole in the frame alongside where the low external cable guide screws in. They can all get gunked up (usually by silt from water/rain so looks like soil/'mud').

Got soaked again on this mornings commute, knew it was coming now I've not had time to fix my mudguard mount issue! Typical! :rolleyes:
 
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The Hambini video is good and he is very clear in showing you how it works. The one I watched he has a one piece BB so you can pull it through the frame. My cups have a lip so I’d need a wider removal tool, also I’d have to pull one side out and then the other.

As you’ve said it doesn’t look difficult. His tools are just machined from delrin or a similar hard material. Just need the diameters to be correct and the back end to be thick enough that it doesn’t fail when you wind out hence my initial thought to just use a big socket as it will be more than enough for the job.

Not sure if I can easily remove the bearings from the cup or if I want to remove the whole cup & then remove the bearing. Or replace the lot. Not cheap… but I have had 3 years so far no issues.

My bike has a cable guide at the BB so should let water out and at least let air in! Drilled a hole on my winter bike specially.
 
Soldato
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That Park one is a perfect tool, good ears for unscrewing and then a hex in the middle for correct torque when refitting. Thanks for sharing, ordered! :cool:
The torque is 1.5NM max. Do you have a suitable torque wrench? :D
Pretty sure I had to tighten to over 1.5NM but not the 15NM the previous guy did.

Don't you have a bottom 'hole' for any cable routing or a cable guide below the BB? Worth checking it's not got a hole there which is blocked.

I know I only have 2 brands of bike (4 frames of but very 'mainstream'/off the shelf) but they've all had one or the other which has a hole in it/next to it that drains the frame. On my Diverge & Contend (internal cables) it's a screwable cover which has a hole in it for draining. On the Defy and Avail it's a hole in the frame alongside where the low external cable guide screws in. They can all get gunked up (usually by silt from water/rain so looks like soil/'mud').

Got soaked again on this mornings commute, knew it was coming now I've not had time to fix my mudguard mount issue! Typical! :rolleyes:
There is a hole for the front derailleur cable to go up behind the BB (behind the seat tube). I think the water is the other side (downtube) side of the BB though. I usually end up having to drain it by removing the seatpost.
 
Soldato
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Yup yup hence my surprise at the suggestion of checking the torque :D
I definitely had to tighten mine more though to stop the wobble... perhaps something up with the cranks especially considering they require quite a tap to fit.
 
Soldato
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The Hambini video is good and he is very clear in showing you how it works. The one I watched he has a one piece BB so you can pull it through the frame. My cups have a lip so I’d need a wider removal tool, also I’d have to pull one side out and then the other.

As you’ve said it doesn’t look difficult. His tools are just machined from delrin or a similar hard material. Just need the diameters to be correct and the back end to be thick enough that it doesn’t fail when you wind out hence my initial thought to just use a big socket as it will be more than enough for the job.

Not sure if I can easily remove the bearings from the cup or if I want to remove the whole cup & then remove the bearing. Or replace the lot. Not cheap… but I have had 3 years so far no issues.

My bike has a cable guide at the BB so should let water out and at least let air in! Drilled a hole on my winter bike specially.

Say what you like about Hambini, I really do get it as he's really crass sometimes. Sometimes I find him funny and it's good he doesn't have an ego or too much care about what people think about him. But other times he's a child and some more isolated times he's really a troll and possibly borderline creepy/does questionable things.

But he is with very little doubt a fantastic and accurate engineer and the few times I emailed him an oddity before was quite helpful and insightful.

With the issue you have, I'd say removing the bearing and keeping the BB in the frame is probably the easiest fix - but the whole premise of that is the bearing being the cause of your problem and not grit/dirt around the BB shell. :(

The torque is 1.5NM max. Do you have a suitable torque wrench? :D
Pretty sure I had to tighten to over 1.5NM but not the 15NM the previous guy did.


There is a hole for the front derailleur cable to go up behind the BB (behind the seat tube). I think the water is the other side (downtube) side of the BB though. I usually end up having to drain it by removing the seatpost.

Ah I figured there would at least be a join or an area around the bb where water from the seattube/downtube meet so any water could escape out the same hole but do realise that is a big assumption! If there is a hole where water can get *in* (headtube/internal cable junctions), then there should at least be a way for it to get *out*! ;)

Wow is it only 1.5nM?! I've been doing them probably 3-4, no wonder the plastic tool cams out and doesn't tighten any more! Ooops! :cry:

I've got one of those bendy metal ones that come with canyons. Great for those low torque values

I think they're similar to the little Topeak I'm using? Simple, neat quick and easy tool, but I do question it's accuracy now it's a few years old... But it's probably more accurate than my fingers lol
 
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Soldato
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Quickest way to get water out of a lot of bikes is take the fork out as the water can **** straight out the huge head tube.

My wheels are full of water after yesterday when the rain came on pretty mega. Had to ride hard as hell to stay warm:o
 
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I’m overdue a spring clean, new bar tape etc so be a good time to just check the head tube bearings (should be good as did them not too long ago) and a general once over. I already have the tape, just making the time to do it!

Couldn’t be bothered to ride a time trial tonight, made my excuses in my head (windy, cold, might rain on the way home, roadworks near the start). Went and did a couple of hrs hard by myself instead. Need to do some different courses or something to keep myself motivated I think.
 
Soldato
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I think they're similar to the little Topeak I'm using? Simple, neat quick and easy tool, but I do question it's accuracy now it's a few years old... But it's probably more accurate than my fingers lol
Good luck doing 7NM+ on one of these :D
made my excuses in my head (windy, cold, might rain on the way home, roadworks near the start)
That's quite the list of excuses :D

I'm peeved recently... My area is littered with level crossings. It has a distinct lack of road bridges. Health and safety standards nowadays seem to mandate they come down around 2-3mins before the train and there's often multiple trains so it can be 5 mins+. I used to start 70% of my rides by going via a level crossing that was only half width across the road and it generally came down just 30s before the train. They've just replaced it with a full width crossing like the 3 others so now quite often I get stuck for 5+ mins at the start/end of my ride. Feels pretty significant on short rides.
 
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Portsmouth
Finally back to some sort of normality after last weeks sickness, actually able to push 200+w for more than 30 seconds at a time last night just in time for a couple of long rides this weekend before 3 and a half weeks off the bike for my honeymoon. Not sure how i'm going to cope!
 
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