Small bathroom ideas, window inside shower? (Plans inside)

Soldato
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I know of no reasons why you cant install a wet wet room in a loft. Lots of companies actually specialise in wetrooms for loft conversions.
Fair enough. I don't really understand the point of a wet room though. Especially a small one. Go in, have a shower and soak the place, then get dressed then want to go for a pee in your socks? Doesn't make sense to me :o

why do you need shutters - isn't it privacy frosted ? will there be an opening window panel though, to help with the extraction duties..
It will be frosted yes, judging by some of our neighbours frosting can vary :p We'll definitely have shutters or blinds anyway, it's south facing so could get super hot in summer with the sun on it all day. E.g. our first floor bathroom does get very hot when it's 20c+ outside.

having a bathroom just at top of stairs does sound a safety issue
You might be right, and I'm half tempted by moving the door to next to the window. I've just done measuring and the chest of drawers I've shown in the Sketchup (to scale) would actually fit next to a 630mm door there. (I think) Our first floor bathroom is at the top of the stairs and occasionally in the night I've had a moment, but it is what it is... Architect didn't seem to have an issue.

As commented, space looks tight, parents don't use their onsuite shower much since it is not very comfortable to turn around & efficiently shower;
do you have hot water supply for 2 simultaneous showers too, I think I'd just have a (genuine) ensuite with basin+loo.
The shower wouldn't actually be all that small though. Can probably do 700x1100mm I think in the current layout. Hell I've just measured the bath/shower in our main bathroom and that's less than 700mm wide where the glass panel is.
 
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I've just done measuring and the chest of drawers I've shown in the Sketchup (to scale) would actually fit next to a 630mm door there.
yes - having the bathroom door next to window - where there needs to be an entrance its nice to have a space/view/radiator anyway, with shower across inner wall opposite window; basin by window - thats always a winner, too - natural light to shave&teeth

e2: parents have that sliding door too - there's is a bit rickety - maybe you can get smoother ones
 
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Soldato
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Small update. We have expanded the bathroom by 100mm :p Haha.. still going with the shower on your left as you enter, and the toilet and sink against the rear external wall. We made it slightly wider to be sure we'd fit the 760mm wide shower tray, and 600m door in.

Question, my girlfriend seems dead set against a concealed cistern for the toilet. Given it is going against an external wall, will it actually save us space or would they need to allow extra depth to fit one? She is mainly concerned about issues accessing it should we need to. I seem to have won the argument for a wall-mounted vanity unit (makes the space look bigger, easier to clean etc.). We also made the window alot smaller to allow wall space for a cupboard/mirror above the sink.

EDIT: Excuse the quick paint but this is the layout;
yMwHNlS.png


So would we save any space by concealing the cistern? Or would they need to make the external wall thicker to accommodate it anyway? :confused:
 
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Caporegime
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@Scam You need very little depth for a wall-hung toilet or other concealed cistern, I think the Grohe ones can be as little as 150mm, which no close coupled options would get close to.

I will always fit wall-hung concealed cisterns now, given the option, as they look better / more modern, give you a shelf if you want it, and make it easier to clean the floor.

There are really no concerns about access to the flush cistern etc. because it's all serviceable through the flush plate. What I do though just to make sure is put a tiled removable shelf on top of the WC frame. Or you can go full height with the wall to make it flush and put a down lit niche or two in to sex it up.

You do have to get the waste right, ensure it's not leaking etc., as that won't normally be accessible once tiled, depending on whether or not a service gap is left in the tiles behind the toilet.
 
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If the loo and the basin are switched any increased depth due to cistern avoids narrowed space you'd otherwise have between it and shower

take care on height of basin and toilet .. not sure if this is a trend (people taller?), parents recent bathroom refit they have a basin and rimless (which seems to flush ok) toilet which must be, each, 2" higher ... so if you ever wash feet/hair in basin it's much harder
 
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Thanks @Participant but can they be mounted on external brick walls? It's an old terraced house so I think the term is single brick walls. There's literally the brick, then the internal insulation they're putting in, then plasterboard etc. My quick Googling seems to suggest it's not possible because obviously your cistern will not be insulated and could freeze etc. and cause all sorts of problems.

If the loo and the basin are switched any increased depth due to cistern avoids narrowed space you'd otherwise have between it and shower

take care on height of basin and toilet .. not sure if this is a trend (people taller?), parents recent bathroom refit they have a basin and rimless (which seems to flush ok) toilet which must be, each, 2" higher ... so if you ever wash feet/hair in basin it's much harder
We thought about this but decided we wanted the sink more accessible (nicer to walk straight in to use it rather than skirting round the shower). Plus the tall thin sash window lines up nicely externally when it's on the left side of the bathroom as you're in it (i.e. above the toilet as per my plan above). Window in front of the sink is a pain and means no mirror/cabinet etc.

PS: What the heck is a rimless toilet anyway? We have noticed a few toilets advertised as 'comfort' which I think means taller...
 
Soldato
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Window in front of the sink is a pain and means no mirror/cabinet etc.
although ours doesn't have cistern concealed there is a box wall section 8" deep up to the level of the window tiled into window, across room width, which gives a surface behind the sink to place a mirror/stuff. brushing/shaving in - daylight is great.
box must be pretty empty, and could have had cistern inside.
 
Associate
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remember you can have a shower as wide as you want 1200mm or wider but you just stand in the middle with at max elbows out, so you could flip the actual shower 90* if it helps you out and i wouldn't go for a rectangular enclosure look at offset ones
 
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Thanks @Participant but can they be mounted on external brick walls? It's an old terraced house so I think the term is single brick walls. There's literally the brick, then the internal insulation they're putting in, then plasterboard etc. My quick Googling seems to suggest it's not possible because obviously your cistern will not be insulated and could freeze etc. and cause all sorts of problems.


We thought about this but decided we wanted the sink more accessible (nicer to walk straight in to use it rather than skirting round the shower). Plus the tall thin sash window lines up nicely externally when it's on the left side of the bathroom as you're in it (i.e. above the toilet as per my plan above). Window in front of the sink is a pain and means no mirror/cabinet etc.

PS: What the heck is a rimless toilet anyway? We have noticed a few toilets advertised as 'comfort' which I think means taller...
comfort does mean the pan is taller to make it easier to get on/off it
 
Associate
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Small update. We have expanded the bathroom by 100mm :p Haha.. still going with the shower on your left as you enter, and the toilet and sink against the rear external wall. We made it slightly wider to be sure we'd fit the 760mm wide shower tray, and 600m door in.

Question, my girlfriend seems dead set against a concealed cistern for the toilet. Given it is going against an external wall, will it actually save us space or would they need to allow extra depth to fit one? She is mainly concerned about issues accessing it should we need to. I seem to have won the argument for a wall-mounted vanity unit (makes the space look bigger, easier to clean etc.). We also made the window alot smaller to allow wall space for a cupboard/mirror above the sink.

EDIT: Excuse the quick paint but this is the layout;
yMwHNlS.png


So would we save any space by concealing the cistern? Or would they need to make the external wall thicker to accommodate it anyway? :confused:
If it was me i would try to get an extra 40mm to accommodate an 800 quad/offset quad. Quad is equal both sides offset will be longer on one end, you don't need door facings if that helps tile right up to the doorway to get that extra 40mm
 
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