Solar panels and battery - any real world reccomendations?

Caporegime
Joined
13 Jan 2010
Posts
26,387
Location
Llaneirwg
I think the days of solar being a negative to a house are long gone.

I see it at minimum being something to make your house more saleable even if it adds no value, best case the majority of the value you spent is added to your house price.
Reality is somewhere in the middle I suspect

Must be close. I mean I would personally look positively on a modern install. It's hard with the tech moving so rapidly. Don't want to be a beta tester
 
Soldato
Joined
3 May 2012
Posts
5,389
Special installations - Part P?

So I was doing some digging on this, mainly through a mate of mine that fits security alarms but he knows an electrician though that.

Anyway, he reckons that because they install the solar system inbetween your meter and your consumer unit (or at least the meter side of the comsumer unit) it doesnt technically count an a modification to your existing home wiring, and therefore is basically exlcuded from pretty much all of the usual regulation, including part P (apparently).

Apparently as part of the electrician qualification (barewith me because I dont know what I am talking about just relaying) but to install solar youd only need to do a "seperate part of the 18th edition course" to be able to install solar, or as he said, they can install a complete solar system in your house, but probably not qualified to wire up a plug socket.
 

SBo

SBo

Associate
Joined
1 Apr 2022
Posts
72
Location
Bucks
So I was doing some digging on this, mainly through a mate of mine that fits security alarms but he knows an electrician though that.

Anyway, he reckons that because they install the solar system inbetween your meter and your consumer unit (or at least the meter side of the comsumer unit) it doesnt technically count an a modification to your existing home wiring, and therefore is basically exlcuded from pretty much all of the usual regulation, including part P (apparently).

Apparently as part of the electrician qualification (barewith me because I dont know what I am talking about just relaying) but to install solar youd only need to do a "seperate part of the 18th edition course" to be able to install solar, or as he said, they can install a complete solar system in your house, but probably not qualified to wire up a plug socket.
Yeah that’s nonsense. Installing a new circuit in a consumer unit is notifiable work, installing a new consumer unit is also notifable work; so in any instance it is Part P applicable.
That said it is fairly straight forward work.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Dec 2012
Posts
1,203
Location
A sunny part of Kent
Anyway, he reckons that because they install the solar system inbetween your meter and your consumer unit (or at least the meter side of the comsumer unit) it doesnt technically count an a modification to your existing home wiring, and therefore is basically exlcuded from pretty much all of the usual regulation, including part P (apparently).

That's wrong, it's usually wired off the consumer unit as per any other circuit.
 
Commissario
Joined
17 Oct 2002
Posts
31,125
Location
Panting like a fiend
That's wrong, it's usually wired off the consumer unit as per any other circuit.
Also even if it was wired between the meter and the CU it would still be part of the "household wiring" as anything after the meter is considered part of the household wiring, and anything before the meter is part of the supply companies wiring and thus you're not allowed to touch and is IIRC under even stricter regulation.
 

SBo

SBo

Associate
Joined
1 Apr 2022
Posts
72
Location
Bucks
I’m not sure there’s enough full sparks in the country to do all the solar installs however. I suspect most installers have done the PV course or the EV charging point course rather than the whole shebang.

We got a building control certificate and MCS certificate in our sign off but not an electrical installation test report. I don’t think they megga tested the new circuit / recorded the results for example as I would have expected a full spark to do.
 
Soldato
Joined
3 May 2012
Posts
5,389
I’m not sure there’s enough full sparks in the country to do all the solar installs however. I suspect most installers have done the PV course or the EV charging point course rather than the whole shebang.

We got a building control certificate and MCS certificate in our sign off but not an electrical installation test report. I don’t think they megga tested the new circuit / recorded the results for example as I would have expected a full spark to do.

Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the building control part sort of seperate to the electrical installation?

More to do with the strength of the roof etc?

I'm trawling through and seems the work is certifiable, so just wondering if the MCS certificate covers this, or...if an installer isn't MCS certified what they should be giving you after the install otherwise, assuming the company is legit.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Dec 2012
Posts
1,203
Location
A sunny part of Kent
@BUDFORCE Building control has to be notified with regard to electrical work, but a proper electrician can self certify it, they will still notify building control. My solar install shows against my house, as does my gas boiler, and hob. Double glazing is also notifiable.
 
Soldato
Joined
3 May 2012
Posts
5,389
@BUDFORCE Building control has to be notified with regard to electrical work, but a proper electrician can self certify it, they will still notify building control. My solar install shows against my house, as does my gas boiler, and hob. Double glazing is also notifiable.

Ok so provided they notify building control your good?
 
Associate
Joined
20 Jan 2012
Posts
11
So here is a frustrating situation I would welcome any ideas on.
Found what seems to be good installer who proposed a 5.6kw array over my south facing front roof + two east west gables also on the front. Givenergy kit. Decent price.
But where I live the houses are leasehold and you have to seek consent to do any works to your property.
Long story short, leaseholder has refused consent on the grounds of aesthetics - panels will not fit in with the look of the estate.
Needless to say I am not best pleased.
They may consider if the array is on the rear roof, but that is basically north facing.

Anyone any thoughts or ideas?

Cheers
 
Soldato
Joined
20 Jul 2009
Posts
4,588
Location
The bleak North East arm pit of Britain
So here is a frustrating situation I would welcome any ideas on.
Found what seems to be good installer who proposed a 5.6kw array over my south facing front roof + two east west gables also on the front. Givenergy kit. Decent price.
But where I live the houses are leasehold and you have to seek consent to do any works to your property.
Long story short, leaseholder has refused consent on the grounds of aesthetics - panels will not fit in with the look of the estate.
Needless to say I am not best pleased.
They may consider if the array is on the rear roof, but that is basically north facing.

Anyone any thoughts or ideas?

Cheers
Do it anyway. With the government pushing for green energy, a company actively going against that would attract the sort of media attention that would realign their views pretty sharpish.
 
Joined
4 Aug 2007
Posts
15,177
Location
Wilds of suffolk
So here is a frustrating situation I would welcome any ideas on.
Found what seems to be good installer who proposed a 5.6kw array over my south facing front roof + two east west gables also on the front. Givenergy kit. Decent price.
But where I live the houses are leasehold and you have to seek consent to do any works to your property.
Long story short, leaseholder has refused consent on the grounds of aesthetics - panels will not fit in with the look of the estate.
Needless to say I am not best pleased.
They may consider if the array is on the rear roof, but that is basically north facing.

Anyone any thoughts or ideas?

Cheers

Anyone else with panels?, assume not
Could be worth asking all those around you, are you considering them, if enough are you may be able to pressure the leaseholder as being unreasonable.
Their only defence can really be on the depreciating their asset value based on looks, but if you can evidence it does nothing of the sort they are then confirmed being unreasonable.

Whats the general aesthetics like? Work vans, caravans, shedy cars, untidy gardens etc
What about other things, sky dishes, TV aerials etc

IMO the old they look bad is very much a matter of opinion and as they are becoming far more common for many people they are nothing but neutral now anyway
 
Soldato
Joined
18 Oct 2002
Posts
12,374
Location
West Midlands
Anyone any thoughts or ideas?

Take them to court if they try and stop you, name and shame them in the local papers.

Using "ruining the looks" on what I assume is a none listed building, in a non conservation area just won't wash with the uphill struggle the planet is facing tbh.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Dec 2012
Posts
1,203
Location
A sunny part of Kent
Ok so provided they notify building control your good?
As long as the installer certifies the installation, which is what building control require. I could notify building control of my intent to do electrical work, but I can't certify it. Some councils will certify the work for you, for a fee of course, but not all.
 
Soldato
Joined
3 May 2012
Posts
5,389
, leaseholder has refused consent
Freeholder not leaseholder.

But that is very bad, as above I would push back put it in the media etc, would they rather a nuclear power station next door, maybe to go with their moral values they themselves, should no longer use electricity.
 
Associate
Joined
3 Dec 2012
Posts
1,203
Location
A sunny part of Kent
Long story short, leaseholder has refused consent on the grounds of aesthetics - panels will not fit in with the look of the estate.


If the information in the above link is correct they don't have a leg to stand on.

Might be some useful info here https://www.lease-advice.org/articl...ehold-property-what-charges-can-be-justified/
 
Soldato
Joined
25 Mar 2004
Posts
11,144
Location
Fareham
So here is a frustrating situation I would welcome any ideas on.
Found what seems to be good installer who proposed a 5.6kw array over my south facing front roof + two east west gables also on the front. Givenergy kit. Decent price.
But where I live the houses are leasehold and you have to seek consent to do any works to your property.
Long story short, leaseholder has refused consent on the grounds of aesthetics - panels will not fit in with the look of the estate.
Needless to say I am not best pleased.
They may consider if the array is on the rear roof, but that is basically north facing.

Anyone any thoughts or ideas?

Cheers

Are there more specifics for your leasehold agreement you can share?

For example is the property in question shared ownership, or one of those ones that should be a freehold but was instead sold as a leasehold where you own 100% of the property but there you only own the leasehold?

I agree with the link that @Ron-ski posted, panels aren't really too different to people throwing up satellite dishes everywhere, and panels are reversible as an adjustment rather than permanent, in theory the panels can be removed and tiles replaced to set the roof back to how it was before.
 
Associate
Joined
9 Mar 2022
Posts
127
Location
Notts
Are there more specifics for your leasehold agreement you can share?

For example is the property in question shared ownership, or one of those ones that should be a freehold but was instead sold as a leasehold where you own 100% of the property but there you only own the leasehold?

I agree with the link that @Ron-ski posted, panels aren't really too different to people throwing up satellite dishes everywhere, and panels are reversible as an adjustment rather than permanent, in theory the panels can be removed and tiles replaced to set the roof back to how it was before.
And if that reference is case law, it may be used as reference if you need to pursue legal avenues.
 
Top Bottom