This Business and Moment...

Soldato
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Annual review done - €8500 salary uplift finalised from my discussion with the boss the other week, which I'm happy with, and some other small performance related incentives to go along with it, which was just an idea at the time but has now been fleshed out a bit more.

My MD knows I could earn more elsewhere, and can't quite compete with those salaries - but from my side I am afforded many intangible benefits here that I would be very unlikely to get elsewhere, so I think it's a fair arrangement we have.

For any hiring managers; have you experienced a drop in commitment from candidates? Just recently we've had a run of candidates either accept positions and then ghost us, receive contracts and not sign them, or accept positions and then U turn shortly afterwards for a better offer.
I must stress that these are all remote IT positions in a very competitive niche industry, but it just seems people are less invested in committing to things at the moment.

I'm not an hiring manger myself but I have been going to alot of interviews over the past few months. If this is happening then you are not offering a good enough salary for them to commit. Obviously they are going else where which pays more, which you need to match or beat.

Thanks to the pandemic the job market is in the employees hands not the employers.
 
Man of Honour
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Ottakring, Vienna.
Yep, we're fully aware that we are slightly (and I do really mean slightly) behind the larger partners, but we offer significantly better working conditions and opportunities as an offset to that.

If people are purely coin operated then I understand that, but for me there's a lot more that goes into accepting an offer them just the cash hitting my bank account every month.

Edit - I should emphasise that these people aren't receiving salary as a surprise - this is people who are already in the industry, know what the approximate pay is for these roles, have accepted terms and so on, and then just suddenly backed out.
 
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Ev0

Ev0

Soldato
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18 Oct 2002
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13,980
Tried to write out a post with the details of my dilemma and it became a bit of a monster.

To try a and summarise, currently tech pre sales for large vendor. I Like my role and products I work with (a market leader), package is very good, but there are issues on the counter part sales team side which are having a knock on effect to earnings.

Small specialist vendor with competitive product offered me a role, same base, but you’d hope a sales team that’s running ok as this is all they do.

Benefits better at current big co, but the smaller place is pre ipo (2-3 year expectation).

I’m torn as is genuinely really like where I am now, excellent money and work life balance, just some of the things outside of my immediate team which impact me are not good and aren’t going to be getting better for a while.
 
Soldato
Joined
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11,872
Tried to write out a post with the details of my dilemma and it became a bit of a monster.

To try a and summarise, currently tech pre sales for large vendor. I Like my role and products I work with (a market leader), package is very good, but there are issues on the counter part sales team side which are having a knock on effect to earnings.

Small specialist vendor with competitive product offered me a role, same base, but you’d hope a sales team that’s running ok as this is all they do.

Benefits better at current big co, but the smaller place is pre ipo (2-3 year expectation).

I’m torn as is genuinely really like where I am now, excellent money and work life balance, just some of the things outside of my immediate team which impact me are not good and aren’t going to be getting better for a while.
You are a pre-sales software person. You do not speak loyalty, you speak dollars. Go to pre-IPO company and prosper.

If any one of my software vendor contacts stick around too long I get suspicious.
 
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Soldato
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13 Jan 2003
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Just had a response from an application sent yesterday - not even through a job site.. I did catch the CTO having a look at my LinkedIn profile..

"Unfortunately, we will not be taking your application forwards at this time as we feel our company is too small, based on your previous experience."

Hmm. I don't have sharp teeth lol.
 
Soldato
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Just had 2 weeks off, first day back today - my god, can't believe I have 1 month left to go, it just sucks lol.

I'm being micromanaged, nagged and harassed to hell and it's really winding me up, I absolutely hate it.

Anyone else here ever been micromanaged? It's enough to drive you ****** nuts!
 
Soldato
Joined
11 Sep 2009
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13,133
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France, Alsace
I am mega busy with some stuff at work but I can't help but think half the senior leadership team just are looking at it wrong. It's driving me mental but at the same time, I'm working on the highest value stuff I can think will be, so that's at least something.

I got a call last Tuesday from a guy I met from a product analytics company. We've known each other through my job for over a year now and as a vendor / potential vendor we have a way more casual relationship now. He asked if I wanted to come to Bern the next day (last weds) to a product leadership summit for free as he was there. I was like **** it, told work and went. Ended up getting leathered with him and some product guys. Was actually really useful for work too, but also personally.
While there, he was like, want to come to our conference on 26th May for 3 days? I was like yea, sure, where is it? Vegas... ha so he's sorted me tickets. Work were like OK, we'll sort out the rest if you have tickets. So on Monday I fly to Vegas for the week.

It's been a mad time. I have had 2 podcast interviews, I have been building out loads of personal things. Was in Bern Wed, Bordeaux from Thurs - Sunday. Have the kids this week. Alps this weekend and then fly out to Vegas Monday. It's all a bit mental to be honest but I have a thing in life that being open to opportunities brings about so many more. So windmilling in and seeing where it goes.
 
Caporegime
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127.0.0.1
Just had 2 weeks off, first day back today - my god, can't believe I have 1 month left to go, it just sucks lol.

I'm being micromanaged, nagged and harassed to hell and it's really winding me up, I absolutely hate it.

Anyone else here ever been micromanaged? It's enough to drive you ****** nuts!

If you only have 1 month just tell them to **** ***. Micro management is horrible.
 
Soldato
Joined
13 Jan 2003
Posts
21,177
If you only have 1 month just tell them to **** ***. Micro management is horrible.

Ahh the “they’re leaving so dump as muc on them to get as much done.. and anything goes wrong simple to pass off the blame” game.
It sounds an ingrained culture of the company. Only had thay once.
 
Man of Honour
Joined
25 Oct 2002
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Hampshire
Anyone else here ever been micromanaged?
I was micromanaged a bit when I first moved into a consultancy role which was frustrating but thankfully the manager was also a very competent individual who I have a lot of time for. He also mentored me a bit and looking back some of the things that felt unnecessary and annoying were just improving my craft. An example would be he was quite fussy about the documentation I would produce, multiple iterations of feedback etc. I regard[ed] myself as pretty good at documentation and it felt I was being asked to dumb stuff down at times, being super explicit about things I considered obvious. Like I'd add in a caveat (made up example "It should be noted that in some cases data attribute X is not populated") and he'd pick up on it and want it spelled out why that caveat mattered (what the implications of X not being there might be). There were times when I would say **** it I'll just remove that section I've added in as a bonus then if you're just going to be awkward about it! In hindsight he was just guiding me to make things as transparent and easy as possible for people, assume the reader is less intelligent and less familiar with the subject matter, a busy person for whom this document is a very minor part of their day.

The stuff I didn't like so much was especially in the early days he also wanted to see mini-plans for small pieces of work. I found this frustrating, I'd be like I just want to get on and deliver it, I don't want to write out a plan for something that will be done in a week. Part of this I think was just trying to get confidence that I would be approaching things the right way as I was new to the job, but it was pretty alien to me. I'd never had to really explain how I was going to do something before I did it before.

I also had the shoe on the other foot at one point where I had someone reporting to me, both of us fairly new in the role who provided feedback that I was micromanaging them. I felt this was a bit unfair, I was playing devil's advocate a bit and highlighting potential pitfalls in her approaches but also being pretty supportive and giving her enough free rein to run things her way rather than dictating. What this taught me was that micromanagement is partly about perception, even when I felt I was deliberately avoiding micromanagement, she still felt micromanaged based on me providing feedback or views on what had/hadn't worked well in the past. I'm not sure what the takeaway from that should be, part of me tongue in cheek thinks if optional guidance is considered micromanaging then I might as well have just gone all in and micromanaged to have things done the way I thought best. It was just strange though, like feedback I totally wasn't expecting because I felt I'd been actively avoiding micromanagement.
 
Soldato
Joined
29 Dec 2014
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4,630
Location
16509
I was micromanaged a bit when I first moved into a consultancy role which was frustrating but thankfully the manager was also a very competent individual who I have a lot of time for. He also mentored me a bit and looking back some of the things that felt unnecessary and annoying were just improving my craft

Yeah this is more just like constant nagging... "what next?" "when will it be done" "what are you doing right now?" endless stuff it's getting on my mammaries if I'm quite honest, lol.

I'm trying to rate-limit it, by taking a long time to reply to anything, trying to drag everything out as much as possible, but it's still annoying af.
 
Caporegime
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Birmingham




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Soldato
Joined
12 Dec 2006
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4,333
I was micromanaged a bit when I first moved into a consultancy role which was frustrating but thankfully the manager was also a very competent individual who I have a lot of time for. He also mentored me a bit and looking back some of the things that felt unnecessary and annoying were just improving my craft. An example would be he was quite fussy about the documentation I would produce, multiple iterations of feedback etc. I regard[ed] myself as pretty good at documentation and it felt I was being asked to dumb stuff down at times, being super explicit about things I considered obvious. Like I'd add in a caveat (made up example "It should be noted that in some cases data attribute X is not populated") and he'd pick up on it and want it spelled out why that caveat mattered (what the implications of X not being there might be). There were times when I would say **** it I'll just remove that section I've added in as a bonus then if you're just going to be awkward about it! In hindsight he was just guiding me to make things as transparent and easy as possible for people, assume the reader is less intelligent and less familiar with the subject matter, a busy person for whom this document is a very minor part of their day.

The stuff I didn't like so much was especially in the early days he also wanted to see mini-plans for small pieces of work. I found this frustrating, I'd be like I just want to get on and deliver it, I don't want to write out a plan for something that will be done in a week. Part of this I think was just trying to get confidence that I would be approaching things the right way as I was new to the job, but it was pretty alien to me. I'd never had to really explain how I was going to do something before I did it before.

I also had the shoe on the other foot at one point where I had someone reporting to me, both of us fairly new in the role who provided feedback that I was micromanaging them. I felt this was a bit unfair, I was playing devil's advocate a bit and highlighting potential pitfalls in her approaches but also being pretty supportive and giving her enough free rein to run things her way rather than dictating. What this taught me was that micromanagement is partly about perception, even when I felt I was deliberately avoiding micromanagement, she still felt micromanaged based on me providing feedback or views on what had/hadn't worked well in the past. I'm not sure what the takeaway from that should be, part of me tongue in cheek thinks if optional guidance is considered micromanaging then I might as well have just gone all in and micromanaged to have things done the way I thought best. It was just strange though, like feedback I totally wasn't expecting because I felt I'd been actively avoiding micromanagement.

I think you should be careful that someone else micromanagement habits don't rub off and become your habits.

No one needs multiple iterations of changes. Not once someone is beyond a basic level.
 
Caporegime
Joined
20 Sep 2006
Posts
28,322
It looks as if Broadcom are going to acquire VMware (who I work for). This makes me sad. They have a history of culling staff and are entirely driven by profit, seemingly at the expense of the employees. They're also renowned for making things notoriously difficult for their customers. Maybe with the size of the acquisition and the fact that Broadcom software is rebranding as VMware may make this one different, but I'm not sure.

I've got some difficult decisions to make rather unexpectedly.
:(


Stay and risk being culled, or reap the divident/share rewards if I keep my job. Maybe the culture won't change, no one really knows.

Or stay and jump ship as we learn more, but that might be at a time lots of VMware talent are also jumping ship.

Or leave early, as in, within the next few months.
 
Soldato
Joined
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Not here
It looks as if Broadcom are going to acquire VMware (who I work for). This makes me sad. They have a history of culling staff and are entirely driven by profit, seemingly at the expense of the employees. They're also renowned for making things notoriously difficult for their customers. Maybe with the size of the acquisition and the fact that Broadcom software is rebranding as VMware may make this one different, but I'm not sure.

I've got some difficult decisions to make rather unexpectedly.
:(


Stay and risk being culled, or reap the divident/share rewards if I keep my job. Maybe the culture won't change, no one really knows.

Or stay and jump ship as we learn more, but that might be at a time lots of VMware talent are also jumping ship.

Or leave early, as in, within the next few months.
I would stay and see what happens. Also check the market to see what VMware skills are needed.

Unfortunately there is very little need for VMware skills where I live. Even though I did have an interview for an Senior Vmware Engineer role a few weeks back.
 
Soldato
Joined
13 Jan 2003
Posts
21,177
You'd think with LinkedIn 'Easy Apply' it would be easy for companies to respond. :rolleyes:

Welcome to my world.

1) It appears the current way of working is to keep the role open and advertising for the entire planned period but not respond (if at all) until the role is filled. That way you have all the possible applicants on file should you get ghosted by the applicant at any point until the contract is signed.

2) Typically if you're filtered then you will receive a notification of rejection within a day or two (week max). However going back to my previous point, often the CV is binned during filtering without a response.

Now place yourselves in the position of the applicant. Only those that contact you are interested thus point 1 means the applicant continues to look else where and obtains offers but you want that applicant so now you're into playing catchup with a weak negotiating position and paying to turn the decision. A bidding war then exists.

Companies don't like being told it's their fault or their professionalism at fault but you don't have a commitment until the contract. If you don't manage the recruitment engagement with the individual then you will find the world has moved on. If you've identified the top 3 candidates then I would expect recruitment to manage that engagement..

This is why (a) you get people ghosting and (b) it's a pain for applicants and recruiters alike.
 
Man of Honour
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5 Jun 2003
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Falling...
I've been needing to dramatically re-wire my thinking. I've been so used to large corporations with governance, structure, standards, procedures etc... we're trying to create a far more agile organisation that delivers but is more agile but still compliant with the things we need. It's exciting but chaotic - so we've come to a middle ground were we'll have some light touch governance, but allow as much flexibility and freedom... it's a bit of a behavioural change for me, but I kinda like it.
 
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