When are you going fully electric?

Soldato
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But people who use a premier inn can’t afford a EV unless it’s their company car scheme giving them one. In any case they are able to claim all business expenses do not sure why they would bother when they can claim costs and time for sitting in a charger.

These Car schemes subsided by tax cuts of course …. Discuss

I own a Tesla Model Y and use Premier Inn frequently. Stopped in one last month next to Manchester airport the night before flying to Disneyworld and tends to be be the first place I look for a hotel if we are doing an overnight somewhere.
Just because someone chooses to buy an EV car it doesn't mean they are only allowed to stop at the Savoy :cry:
 
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Soldato
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All EV drivers except Telsa drivers lmao. Awful idea opening up Tesla's (arguably) single USP.

is it?

More potential revenue, more sites potentially - It's ridiculous to think that they weren't going to do it at some point.

I've had a Model3 for 2.5 years and used Superchargers 10 times maybe in that time.... Really doesn't bother me personally at all.

Others will loose their minds no doubt but for me - doesn't change anything.
 
Soldato
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Might have been asked.

Why don't EVs self trickle charge while driving? I know regen breaking does this but what about normal driving. Surely the rotation energy of each four wheels can be put to good use.
 
Caporegime
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Might have been asked.

Why don't EVs self trickle charge while driving? I know regen breaking does this but what about normal driving. Surely the rotation energy of each four wheels can be put to good use.
The motors are stopping the wheels slow down using energy. There’s nothing available to charge
 
Soldato
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Why don't EVs self trickle charge while driving? I know regen breaking does this but what about normal driving. Surely the rotation energy of each four wheels can be put to good use.

They do (or mine does, at least - I'd guess they all do). Any time your moving without applying power (downhill, decelerating to junctions, etc) it'll be regenerating, it's not only when you press the brake.
 
Soldato
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is it?

More potential revenue, more sites potentially - It's ridiculous to think that they weren't going to do it at some point.

I've had a Model3 for 2.5 years and used Superchargers 10 times maybe in that time.... Really doesn't bother me personally at all.

Others will loose their minds no doubt but for me - doesn't change anything.
I drive around a lot for work and have always noticed the Tesla superchargers sitting in convenient locations with plenty of empty bays. So if I were to be in the market for an EV that would be a huge plus in steering me towards a Tesla.

If however that resource is available for other vehicles then that USP is gone.

Also, a Tesla driver who DOES use the supercharger network regularly (possibly even for free depending on when they bought the car) now has the potential to find the site they just used to pull up in and never queue now has a line of Hyundai's, Kia's etc. in front of them. I doubt their reaction will be "Oh, great, look at all these new EVs people are buying. Isn't that wonderful"
 
Soldato
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They have only opened 15 of 112
So far as a trial but realistically depending on how the trial goes that is going to drop to 0% or rise to 100%. Don't get me wrong, I think its a good move in general and it was an unsustainable model to have brand specific chargers once Tesla were no longer the only real player in the game.

I still think that it is quite early to be risking that USP from Tesla's point of view (talking wider than just the UK here) as, beyond the supercharger network, I personally don't see a massive appeal to the brand. Couple that with other manufacturers coming up with appealing alternatives at a rate of knots and his one car in three aim (or whatever it was) suddenly looks even less likely.
 
Caporegime
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I would guess they have capacity at those locations and the 61p/kWh is additional return on their investment rather than sitting idle. But agree they need to keep enough free for their own.

But the USP still existing for Tesla in the hassle free charging. Just plug it in
 
Soldato
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Is it really good news for Tesla owners?

Perhaps initially there might be an inrush of new users, however at the rate Instavolt and Gridserve, not to mention Osprey and all the others that are putting in chargers, people will start being able to shop around based on kWh pricing. Given the feedback they have had so far in Norway (mostly positive) with interviews from people saying it doesn't put them off buying Tesla, and bearing in mind the proportion of EV's is much higher so therefore more demand, yes they are roughly 2-3 years ahead in charger installs, but they are also way further ahead in EV sales as well.
 
Soldato
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15 charger locations isn’t going to make a dent really.

By the time they open up fully there’s going to be a hell of a lot more Instavolts, BPs, Shells, Gridserve locations and it won’t matter that much

According to the information provided to DfT most of these major CPOs have committed to around 5k rapid charge points each by 2025 so there’s going to be tons of choice in a year or two
 
Soldato
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Also I know I’m crazy for even considering this but there’s some good used I Pace incentives going on at the moment. If it had 150kW charging I’d be seriously tempted to trade in the old diesel.
 
Caporegime
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Also I know I’m crazy for even considering this but there’s some good used I Pace incentives going on at the moment. If it had 150kW charging I’d be seriously tempted to trade in the old diesel.
Why crazy. It’s a proper car that’s also EV.

Remember 150kW charging etc are all peak numbers. The charging profile is more interesting.
 
Soldato
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Also I know I’m crazy for even considering this but there’s some good used I Pace incentives going on at the moment. If it had 150kW charging I’d be seriously tempted to trade in the old diesel.

If you do a lot of longer distance driving then it could be a problem. Expect 45 minutes from 10% - 80% and the charging speed will be quite poor above 80%. So in essence you have a 170 mile motorway range after the first leg. Though this is true of most EVs but most will give more miles per minute than the I-Pace due to the better efficiency. A Model Y for example will take about 27 - 30 minutes to add about 190 miles of range. An I-Pace will take about 45 minutes to add 150 miles. Both times are assuming decent weather and temperatures because many EVs suffer from coldgating. Add another 20 minutes, or even treble the total these times in cold wet winter weather. This means charging in colder weather can significantly impact charging times.

An extreme example is the Ioniq 5 or EV6 giving 18 minutes to charge from 10% - 80% in perfect conditions. In winter conditions I have seen some charging tests take well over an hour on the same cars.

Don't just look at the time it takes but the range it adds per minute and how the charging curve looks over the entire range and in different seasons.

If you do mostly normal commutes and drives, the I-Pace is a perfect car. I have an I-Pace on order but it fits my driving profile perfectly as I rarely drive more than 200 miles.
 
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Soldato
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I think Tesla owners would have less issue with the ‘trial’ if the chargers were actually designed to be used by cars with charge ports in locations other than the rear near side corner. Most cars just don’t have their charge port in that location.

The issue is that when most non-Tesla’s turn up the a supercharger, they use one plug and block another because they have no choice to use the station. On some layouts, some cars have to park sideways on, potentially blocking 3.

You combine that with the ‘urinal rule’ for the older V2 chargers to avoid power, you could turn up to a charger with seemingly lots of capacity and not actually be able to get on it.

They need to have a proper rethink of their stall design going forward but the ludicrous thing is that they are continuing to install sites using the standard design while knowingly opening it up to non Tesla’s.

It just makes no sense unless the plan is for them to be ‘open’ but make it suck a pain in the backside to use for non Tesla’s so non of them actually use it.
 
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